Modern criticism of Winston Churchill is fake history – it’s based on quotes taken out of context

Some welcome sanity from historian Andrew Roberts.

British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965) in the garden at 10 Downing Street, London, circa 1943. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill (1874 – 1965) in the garden at 10 Downing Street, London, circa 1943. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

by Andrew Roberts

The movie Darkest Hour, in which Gary Oldman won an Oscar playing Winston Churchill, has garnered many plaudits, and deservedly so. It introduced a new generation to Churchill and the inspiring story of 1940, reminding them of how Britain stood alone for a year against the might and fury of Nazi Germany.

But it has also produced a vicious backlash against Churchill and all that he stood for and unleashed an avalanche of vitriolic abuse, much of it ahistorical and ignorant.

It says more about our modern “fake history” culture than anything about…

via Modern criticism of Winston Churchill is fake history – it’s based on quotes taken out of context – The i – iWeekend #28

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13 thoughts on “Modern criticism of Winston Churchill is fake history – it’s based on quotes taken out of context

  1. I agree with Jennie, very well said. There is much that modern attitudes would criticise in the way earlier generations behaved and spoke. Being ‘products of their time’ may excuse those attitudes, but will never make them right. But from there to cherry-picking the facts of history is a far cry… especially when it seeks to destroy a reputation only in furtherance of a political soap-box. Just as bad is the rewriting of the facts for dramatic purposes, when they are then presented as truth ( except in a small print disclaime no-one sees). In this multimedia age, many youngsters especially will garner a glimpse of history from the screen. I think we owe it to them and to our forebears to present the facts… even if only in essence. That still leaves room for both drama and the freedom to make up one’s own mind.

    Liked by 1 person

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