Palace of pain: Netley, the hospital built for an empire of soldiers | Art and design | The Guardian

An aerial photograph of the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley, Hampshire, in the first world war. Click here to see the full image. All photographs courtesy Marion Ivey

An aerial photograph of the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley, Hampshire, in the first world war. Click here to see the full image. All photographs courtesy Marion Ivey

A hospital orderly, wearing what resembles a butcher’s apron, poses with an equally ominous-looking trolley. Ward maids, country-looking girls, pose in utilitarian overalls designed for dirty work, rather than the pristine starch of nurses’ uniforms. A handsome stable hand, straight out of War Horse and proudly holding a pair of equine charges, looks hesitantly into the camera’s lens. A quartet of stretcher-bearers wait on a dockside to…

via Palace of pain: Netley, the hospital built for an empire of soldiers | Art and design | The Guardian

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Modern criticism of Winston Churchill is fake history – it’s based on quotes taken out of context

Some welcome sanity from historian Andrew Roberts.

British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965) in the garden at 10 Downing Street, London, circa 1943. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill (1874 – 1965) in the garden at 10 Downing Street, London, circa 1943. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

by Andrew Roberts

The movie Darkest Hour, in which Gary Oldman won an Oscar playing Winston Churchill, has garnered many plaudits, and deservedly so. It introduced a new generation to Churchill and the inspiring story of 1940, reminding them of how Britain stood alone for a year against the might and fury of Nazi Germany.

But it has also produced a vicious backlash against Churchill and all that he stood for and unleashed an avalanche of vitriolic abuse, much of it ahistorical and ignorant.

It says more about our modern “fake history” culture than anything about…

via Modern criticism of Winston Churchill is fake history – it’s based on quotes taken out of context – The i – iWeekend #28

easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

easter egg, handmade easter egg, handmade © IWM (EPH 641)

Physical description
A carved wooden Easter egg, in two halves, depicting on one side a painted rural scene with cottage, fields, trees and a blue sky, on the other side are large letters in gold…

via easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

Captain Robert Falcon Scott | Explore Royal Museums Greenwich

Captain Robert Falcon Scott was the first British explorer to reach the South Pole and explore Antarctica extensively by land in the early 1900s.

The celebrated explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868–1912) also famously took part in the race to claim the South Pole in 1911, but sadly failed in his mission and died on his return journey…

via Captain Robert Falcon Scott | Explore Royal Museums Greenwich

On this day… – WCH On This Day

Pictured L-R: a police matron, Hettie, Winnie Mason and Alice Wheeldon in custody

Pictured L-R: a police matron, Hettie, Winnie Mason and Alice Wheeldon in custody

On this day, 6 March 1917, the trial of socialist, suffragette and anti-war activist Alice Wheeldon, along with two of her daughters and her son-in-law, began in London at the Old Bailey. She and her family had been framed by…

via On this day… – WCH On This Day

Concluding Thoughts 1: | First World War Hidden History

President Woodrow Wilson addressing Congress before the US Declaration of War

President Woodrow Wilson addressing Congress before the US Declaration of War

A decade ago when we first took up the challenge of Professor Carroll Quigley from his seminal works, Tragedy and Hope and The Anglo-American Establishment to look for evidence of the secret cabal [1] and how they grew into the Secret Elite we were stunned by…

via Concluding Thoughts 1: | First World War Hidden History

When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

The Dreadnought hoaxers in their Abyssinian regalia, with Virginia Woolf on the far left. PUBLIC DOMAIN

EVEN A PERSON RUSHING FOR a tight connection at Paddington Station, London, might have stopped to stare at a strange group making its way onto the train to Weymouth on February 7, 1910. Four people, men of foreign extraction, by all appearances, with luxuriant beards, patterned…

Source: When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them

Portrait of Ethel Smyth, 1901, John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Ethel Smyth (1858 – 1944), 1901, John Singer Sargent

Role-models matter as much as they ever did but women are also significantly under-represented in our history books. Their absence has taken its toll: a 2016 survey carried out by English Heritage revealed that 40 percent of us believe men have had a greater impact on history than women. It’s a misconception, of course. Women have always excelled, we just haven’t easily been able to read their stories because the omission has…

via These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them – The i – Weekend Reads #30

Rosa May Billinghurst: The disabled suffragette abused by police and force-fed in prison

rosamayRosa May Billinghurst endured much in her fight for women to get the vote, yet it is her experience of violent suffrage demonstrations as a disabled campaigner which remains her legacy.

Born in 1875, May Billinghurst was branded…

via Rosa May Billinghurst: The disabled suffragette abused by police and force-fed in prison – The i newspaper online iNews

Franz Reichelt: The Parachuting Pioneer and His Infamous Stunt

I do wish that ArtLark had found a different way to repeat their posts because I have to re-reblog every time as the previous year’s outing then no longer links to the content. Hence this reblog of a reblog today!

A R T L▼R K

51BjddXgkXLOn the 4th of February 1912, Austrian-born inventor and tailor Franz Reichelt, also known as the Flying Tailor, died tragically by jumping from the Eiffel Tower, whilst trying out his own creation, a coat parachute. Even though, having worked on the prototype for two years, and having had it rejected numerous times by aeronautic organisations and competitions, Reichelt had so much foolish confidence in his design that he decided to go ahead with his plan; he said: “I want to try the experiment myself, and without trickery, as I intend to prove the worth of my invention.”

“Reichelt’s pride and joy was a wearable parachute, so that airline pilots could deploy it to increase their chances of survival if they needed to eject from their aircraft (because that happens all the time?).Tests with a prototype from his fifth-floor balcony on dummies proved successful, but those prototypes weighed 150…

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Door Man to the Tsar – My Most Popular Post | toritto

Soon it will be a full hundred years since that fateful July 1914 when Imperial Russia mobilized its armies to confront the Central Powers in what would become World War I.  It was the beginning of the end of the Romanov dynasty and the court of the last Tsar.

The Romanov court required a staggering number of servants.  At the Winter Palace alone over 1,000 were in constant attendance; when the Tsar and the Empress were in actual residence as many as 6,000 were needed.

Now being “in service” to the royal family wasn’t too bad a gig for the time.  Most of those…

via Door Man to the Tsar – My Most Popular Post | toritto

Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Almost a hundred years ago, in February 1918, English women were granted the right to vote. To celebrate…

via Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

October 1, 1918 Lawrence of Arabia – Today in History

I have been in hospital for two weeks, hence the gap in transmission.

Lawrence tried to convince his superiors that Arab independence was in their own best interest, but found himself undermined by the Sykes-Picot agreement, negotiated in secret between French and Br…

Source: October 1, 1918 Lawrence of Arabia – Today in History

Tilly Edinger vs. the Nazis. | Letters from Gondwana.

“Tilly” Edinger was born on November 13, 1897, in Frankfurt, Germany. She was the youngest daughter of the eminent neurologist Ludwig Edinger and Dora Goldschmidt, a leading social advocate and acti…

Source: Tilly Edinger vs. the Nazis. | Letters from Gondwana.

The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog

A guest post by LH Member Suzie Grogan. This article first appeared in London Historians Members’ Newsletter from November 2013. Before 1914, the idea that war could be waged in the air was b…

Source: The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog