The History Girls: August 1914: The Enemy Within? by Leslie Wilson

‘Two Germans entered the tube at Belsize Park. While the train was in motion they conversed in German, but during the short periods of silence at the stations they relapsed into bad, guttural French. Two young men, hearing a reference to carrier pigeons, broke their journey at…

Source: The History Girls: August 1914: The Enemy Within? by Leslie Wilson

A Very Dangerous Woman: Baroness Moura Budberg – Wonders & Marvels

Spy, seductress, aristocrat, Baroness Moura Budberg was a mystery to everyone who knew her, even her closest friends and her children.

In London in the 1950s, she was a renownedMoura in Moscow 1918 saloniste; nobody else had the magnetic charm or the air of danger and mystery that surrounded Baroness Budberg, and her soirées attracted Graham Greene, Laurence Olivier, Guy Burgess, Bertrand Russell, David Lean, E. M. Forster, Peter Ustinov – all came to drink …

Source: A Very Dangerous Woman: Baroness Moura Budberg – Wonders & Marvels

I have just finished reading the book co-authored by Deborah McDonald and Jeremy Dronfield and it’s excellent.  Sarah Vernon

Quietly awaiting Armageddon: “quiver theory” and the summer of 1914. – SeanMunger.com

In the early summer of 1914, Europe had no idea what was coming its way. Are we in a similar daze today?

Source: Quietly awaiting Armageddon: “quiver theory” and the summer of 1914. – SeanMunger.com

George V’s Coronation 1911 — ‘…hats were waving and everybody was yelling…’ | First Night History

FROM THE ARCHIVE: 22nd June 2014

Coronation portrait by Sir Luke Fildes, 1911

Today, 22 June, in 1911, George V was crowned in Westminster Abbey. My great-aunt, Diana Thomas, née Hoskyns, was ten years old when he came to the throne. Her description of the Coronation …

Source: George V’s Coronation 1911 — ‘…hats were waving and everybody was yelling…’ | First Night History

Haddon Musings’ Feminist Friday – Marie Stopes | Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes was born on 15th October 1880 in Edinburgh.  Her father Henry was a brewer, engineer, architect and palaeontologist, and her mother Charlotte was a Shakespearean scholar and women’s rights campaigner.  Her parents had met at one of the meetings of The British Association for the Advancement of Science.  Marie was taken to the meetings, where she met…

Source: Haddon Musings’ Feminist Friday – Marie Stopes | Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

The Fastest girl on Earth: Dorothy Levitt was the first British woman racing driver & holder of the world’s first water speed record

In the more austere time when it was unimaginable for a woman to have an opinion, not to mention operating a vehicle, there was an extraordinary lady who rode cars like a boy, set records, learned to fly, and documented all of her experience so she could inspire  women all over the world to pursue their dream as a racing drivers. Dorothy Levitt or “the fastest girl on earth” was the first British…

Source: The Fastest girl on Earth: Dorothy Levitt was the first British woman racing driver & holder of the world’s first water speed record

Emily Davison and her Blackheath Home | Running Past – 8th June

One of the best known ‘daughters’ of Blackheath was the suffragette Emily Davison, who was born at Roxburgh House, 13 Vanbrugh Park West. She was to die on 8 June 1913 following serious…

Source: Emily Davison and her Blackheath Home | Running Past

Philippe Pétain – The Lion of Verdun – W.U Hstry

Philippe Pétain was 58 years old and a colonel when World War One broke out, and he had never seen active service. Yet within months he was a national hero and a commanding General and would soon c…

Source: Philippe Pétain – The Lion of Verdun – W.U Hstry

The Canary Girls: The workers the war turned yellow – BBC News

Women in munitions factories were tasked with filling shells with explosives [Imperial War Museum]

The sacrifice of soldiers killed during World Wars One and Two is well-documented. But the efforts of munitions workers stained yellow by toxic chemicals is a story much less told. A campaign now hopes to honour the so-called Canary Girls, who…

Source: The Canary Girls: The workers the war turned yellow – BBC News

A precedent for the Holocaust: The Armenian genocide and The Promise | Literaturesalon’s Blog

by Claudia Moscovici

As Peter Balakian points out in the Preface of his book, The Burning Tigris: The Armenian genocide and America’s response (New York: Harper Perennial, 2004), the Holocau…

Source: A precedent for the Holocaust: The Armenian genocide and The Promise | Literaturesalon’s Blog

The ‘Radium Girls’ literally glowed from their work—and then it started killing them

Women painting alarm clock faces with radium in 1932, Ingersoll factory, January 1932. Workers would often lick the paintbrush to achieve a finer point — directly ingesting the radium. (Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images)

At factories like the Radium Luminous Materials Corporation on Third Street in Newark, young women like 14-year-old Katherine Schaub passed their days with tiny paintbrushes in their mouths. Beside each girl sat a small dish of radium powder, which she mixed with a few drops of water and adhesive. The combination made a luminescent…

Source: The ‘Radium Girls’ literally glowed from their work—and then it started killing them

Children of Stalin | toritto

Joe Stalin died on March 5, 1953.  I was almost twelve years old at the time. While such things rarely mattered to kids in middle school, then called junior high, Stalin’s death was the talk …

Source: Children of Stalin | toritto

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

April 22, 1918 – The Red Baron – Today in History

By way of comparison, the highest scoring Allied ace of the Great War was Frenchman René Fonck, with 75 confirmed victories. The highest scoring fighter pilot from the British Empire was Canadian B…

Source: April 22, 1918 – The Red Baron – Today in History

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Volunteer Nurses in the Great War: 1914 | Mrs Daffodil Digresses

The fashionable women of England are very anxious to help. At least they say they are, and never would we doubt a lady’s word. But their good intentions are thwarted on every side. Lord Kitch…

Source: Volunteer Nurses in the Great War: 1914 | Mrs Daffodil Digresses

Orde Wingate: The Most Controversial British Commander of WWII

Born to British parents in India in 1903, Orde Wingate grew up in Britain, living with other relatives at times when his parents were in India. His family was strict Plymouth Brethren – conservative, evangelical, non-conformist Christians. They worked hard to instill their values in Orde.At school, he was friendless. Not playing games or

Source: Orde Wingate: The Most Controversial British Commander of WWII