Celebrating Women’s Equality | seductivevenice

One of the journals edited by Caminer Turra

Happy Women’s Equality Day! In the US, August 26, 1920, was the day women were granted the right to vote when the 19th Amendment was ratified.To celebrate this, I’d like to share with you the story of an early pioneer in women’s equality: Elisabetta Caminer Turra. Here’s a video where I outline her life story and contribution to women’s rights. She lived…

Source: Celebrating Women’s Equality | seductivevenice

Victorian Cosmetics: Red Lip Rouge and Lip Salve for 19th Century Ladies – Mimi Matthews

A Winter’s Walk by James Tissot, 1878.

In the late 18th century, the British Parliament passed a law condemning make-up.  It stated, in part, that “women found guilty of seducing men into matrimony by a cosmetic means could be tried for…

Source: Victorian Cosmetics: Red Lip Rouge and Lip Salve for 19th Century Ladies – Mimi Matthews

Sixteenth-Century Feminist: Lavinia Fontana | A R T L▼R K

On the 24th of August 1552, Italian painter Lavinia Fontana was born in Bologna. She is considered the first ever woman artist to work within the same sphere as her male counterparts, independently and outside a royal court or convent. “The most significant and prolific female artist of the 16th century, Lavinia Fontana opened up opportunities for…

Source: Sixteenth-Century Feminist: Lavinia Fontana | A R T L▼R K

The Most Hated Man In American History | JSTOR Daily

Portrait of Aaron Burr, 1802

A more sympathetic look at Aaron Burr, the man who killed Alexander Hamilton…

Source: The Most Hated Man In American History | JSTOR Daily

Everything You Know About London is Wrong | London Historians’ Blog

eykalisMost of us who love London are aware that there are many canards out there, some of the most obvious relating to Dick Whittington, for example, or the American hotelier who purchased London Bridge. What [Matt] Brown has done is to undertake as deep and wide a trawl as possible and deliver from the most obvious to the most obscure, and if…

Source: Everything You Know About London is Wrong | London Historians’ Blog

vintage everyday: Old Photos of Daily Life of Nicholas II, the Last Tsar of Russia, in the 1910s

Nicolas sharing breakfast with his son Alexei in 1909

Nicholas II was the last tsar of Russia under Romanov rule. His poor handling of Bloody Sunday and Russia’s role in World War I led to his abdication and execution.

Nicholas II was born on May 18, 1868, in Pushkin, Russia. He inherited the throne when his father, Alexander III, died in 1894. Although he believed in autocracy, he was eventually forced to create an elected legislature. Nicholas II’s handling of Bloody Sunday and World War I incensed his subjects and…

Source: vintage everyday: Old Photos of Daily Life of Nicholas II, the Last Tsar of Russia, in the 1910s

Buried Somewhere in the Catskills is a Stash of Nazi Loot | Atlas Obscura

Liberty monoplane over New York City on first leg of its flight to Denmark, with Otto Hillig, photographer, and Capt. Hoérüs, pilot. (Photo: Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

An amateur pilot halted Nazi saboteurs during WWII, but did he then steal their war chest of cash?

Source: Buried Somewhere in the Catskills is a Stash of Nazi Loot | Atlas Obscura

Nye: The Political Life of Aneurin Bevan review – lucid account of a flawed hero | Books | The Guardian

In the pantheon of Labour heroes, indeed among 20th-century politicians as a whole, Aneurin Bevan enjoys one of the foremost places. His towering achievement was the creation of the National Health Service, which he drove through in the teeth of bitter opposition from both the medical profession and the Tories. To this day his legacy – a health service available to all, free at the point of use – is the one part of the postwar consensus that has survived more or less intact the ravages of Thatcherism and the global market.

But all great men have their flaws and, as this lucid, well-researched biography concedes, Bevan’s were…

Source: Nye: The Political Life of Aneurin Bevan review – lucid account of a flawed hero | Books | The Guardian

The Jewish Ghetto and Photonostalgia: Roman Vishniac’s Vanished World | A R T L▼R K

On the 19th of August 1897, one of the world’s most remarkable microbiologists and naturalist photographers, Roman Vishniac was born in Pavlovsk, the Russian Empire. Within the art world, however, …

Source: The Jewish Ghetto and Photonostalgia: Roman Vishniac’s Vanished World | A R T L▼R K

BBC – Future – The killer flood made of molasses

Nearly 100 years ago, a Boston neighbourhood was swamped by a tidal wave of molasses. Veronique Greenwood looks at a design defect that created a bizarre – and deadly – flood.

Source: BBC – Future – The killer flood made of molasses

Interview with a Holocaust Survivor | historywithatwist

Frank Grunwald was just 12 years old when he and his family entered the concentration camps. Terezinstadt, Auschwitz, Melk, Mauthausen . . . he was in them all. Unfortunately, neither his brother n…

Source: Interview with a Holocaust Survivor | historywithatwist

How Flower-Obsessed Victorians Encoded Messages in Bouquets | Atlas Obscura

A Victorian-era print of a bouquet of roses. (Photo: Boston Public Library/CC BY 2.0)

Imagine for a moment that a messenger shows up at the door of your elegantly-appointed Victorian home and hands you a small, ribbon-wrapped bouquet, obviously hand-assembled from somebody’s garden. As an inhabitant of the 21st century, your natural inclination is…

Source: How Flower-Obsessed Victorians Encoded Messages in Bouquets | Atlas Obscura

Dorothea Bate: cave explorer and paleontologist. | Letters from Gondwana.

Dorothea Bate excavating in Bethlehem 1935.

During the 18th and 19th centuries women’s access to science was limited, and science was usually a ‘hobby’ for intelligent wealthy women. A good example is Barbara Hastings (1810–1858), 20th Baron…

Source: Dorothea Bate: cave explorer and paleontologist. | Letters from Gondwana.

Devon’s Shipwrecks | Heritage Calling

Shipwrecks don’t just happen in the deep sea: many ships are driven ashore or lie slowly decaying along riverbanks, estuaries, and creeks. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has given prot…

Source: Devon’s Shipwrecks | Heritage Calling

On this day: a king for Albania | In Times Gone By…

Otto Witte – a German circus performer – claimed he was crowned King of Albania on the 13th of August, 1913. When Albania broke free of the Ottoman Empire and Serbian occupation, a Musl…

Source: On this day: a king for Albania | In Times Gone By…