Buried Alive – Abyss of Communist Crimes – Croatia, the War, and the Future

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The enormity of communist crimes against Croatian people, part of the former Yugoslavia (WWII and post-WWII), is staggering, overwhelming, astonishing… utterly cruel and bestial. These crimes on the whole still go unpunished, ignored and…

via Buried Alive – Abyss of Communist Crimes – Croatia, the War, and the Future

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Grete Schütte-Lihotzky: House Maker, Not Homemaker | A R T L▼R K

51yoyzpijvlOn the 18th of January 2000, Austria’s first female architect, Nazi resistance, as well as Marxist activist Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky died in Vienna five days before her 103rd birthday. Lihotzky became the first female student at the Kunstgewerbeschule, Vienna, where important modern artists such as…

via Grete Schütte-Lihotzky: House Maker, Not Homemaker | A R T L▼R K

Guest Post by William Ellis-Rees – ‘Empress Josephine and the creation of Malmaison’ – All Things Georgian

The Great Glasshouse at Malmaison by Auguste-Siméon Garneray. Musées nationaux de Malmaison, France.

We would once again like to welcome back to our blog, Classics teacher and author of  The Elephant of Exeter Change: A Tale of Cruelty and Confinement in Georgian London, William Ellis-Rees.

William’s guest post this time has as its subject, Empress Josephine, the wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.  Josephine is of course extraordinarily famous, and many biographies of her have appeared over the years.  However, William’s research has unearthed a curious story which does not appear…

via Guest Post by William Ellis-Rees – ‘Empress Josephine and the creation of Malmaison’ – All Things Georgian

All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

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Other than the Elizabethan connection, we really had, at that point, no idea why we had felt the need to visit Haddon Hall. We knew little about the place, apart from the legend of the romantic elopement of Dorothy Vernon…

via All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

High Buildings, Low Morals by Rob Baker | The Great Wen

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I wrote about Rob Baker’s last book – Beautiful Idiots, Brilliant Lunatics – a couple of years ago. It’s a collection of London-based short histories inspired by Rob’s superb blog, Another Nickel In The Machine. Rob’s now written a follow-up, High Buildings, Low Morals, which again explores a dozen London stories from the 20th century, some entirely forgotten and others…

via High Buildings, Low Morals by Rob Baker | The Great Wen

Nancy Perriam – a woman in the Georgian Navy (Guest Post) – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

How many women have you ever seen in movies or on television working alongside men during naval battles? The answer is probably “None”, yet many were there! There were lots of women aboard navy ships during before, during and after the Napoleonic Wars. And some, like Nancy Perriam, taking…

via Nancy Perriam – a woman in the Georgian Navy (Guest Post) – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

A visit to Haddon Hall | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The Vernons mentioned are my forbears! haddonhall

Every time we had driven past Haddon Hall, I had the feeling we needed to go there. The feeling bugged me a bit, as stately homes have not really been part of our research. We tend to be drawn to the landscape and sites things five thousand years old, rather than five hundred, so I could not see why…

via A visit to Haddon Hall | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Military morality: the problem of scruples. – SeanMunger.com

One of the blogs I read, day in and day out, is Padre Steve’s. Steve is a military chaplain with 30+ years experience who has served in Iraq and knows the real face of war inside and out. He is also a historian who has studied and written extensively on Germany in the Weimar and Nazi periods, especially about its military establishment. Very often–in fact, in almost every article–Padre Steve sounds a clear historical warning that the United States is going down exactly the same road of totalitarianism that Germany experienced in the 1920s and 1930s. Steve appears to be a voice in the wilderness, sounding…

via Military morality: the problem of scruples. – SeanMunger.com

Aharon Appelfeld, Holocaust survivor who chronicled its traumas, dies at 85 – The Washington Post

Aharon Appelfeld, who leaped out a window, embedded with a criminal gang and found refuge with a prostitute to survive the Holocaust — all before turning 14 — and who later drew on his childhood experiences to craft lean, dreamlike novels that made him one of Israel’s most acclaimed writers, died Jan. 4 at a…

via Aharon Appelfeld, Holocaust survivor who chronicled its traumas, dies at 85 – The Washington Post

MARIA EDGEWORTH – 250 YEARS ON – Turtle Bunbury

Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) was painted by the Welsh artist John Downman in 1807.

Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) was painted by the Welsh artist John Downman in 1807.

As the Great Famine ripped through the County Longford village of Edgeworthstown in 1847, a tiny octogenarian was to be seen making her way from door-to-door, offering food and nourishment. Many of the beleaguered occupants would have recognised her as Maria Edgeworth, the gifted story-teller whose books had been…

via MARIA EDGEWORTH – 250 YEARS ON – Turtle Bunbury

Government admits ‘losing’ thousands of papers from National Archives | UK news | The Guardian

The hoard came to light during high court proceedings brought by a group of elderly Kenyans who were detained and abused during the Mau Mau insurgency in 1950s Kenya. Photograph: Popperfoto/Getty Images

Thousands of government papers detailing some of the most controversial episodes in 20th-century British history have vanished after civil servants removed them from the country’s National Archives and then reported them as lost.

Documents concerning the Falklands war, Northern Ireland’s Troubles and the infamous Zinoviev letter – in which MI6 officers plotted to bring about the downfall of the first…

via Government admits ‘losing’ thousands of papers from National Archives | UK news | The Guardian

Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Almost a hundred years ago, in February 1918, English women were granted the right to vote. To celebrate…

via Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Ireland’s Alcatraz | historywithatwist

Spike Island, outside Cork Harbour

They sat clothed from head to toe in black, a veil covering their faces, leaving only their eyes visible to look out at the cold limestone walls around them. Their bones ached and their flesh was r…

Source: Ireland’s Alcatraz | historywithatwist

The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

Coloured etching by G. Cruikshank, 1819, after W Hogarth
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

IT WAS ALONG THE OLD Kent Road, somewhere between the town of Epsom and London, that a mob of 18th-century rabble rousers thought they spotted one of King George II’s hated mistresses riding in a carriage, and decided to harass her. But as the crowd gathered around…

via The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

“Dido” Elizabeth Belle

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Dido Elizabeth Belle and the Lady Elizabeth Murray

“Dido” Elizabeth Belle was a bi-racial woman born into slavery in 1761 in the West Indies, the daughter of a slave woman, Maria Belle and a British career naval officer, John Lindsay, who was stationed there.

While the details of their relationship are unknown, Lindsay was transferred back to Britain in 1765 and took the child with him. Lindsay would later in his career be knighted and would reach the rank of Admiral in the British Royal Navy.

Lindsay entrusted the young girl to…

via “Dido” Elizabeth Belle | toritto