When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

The Dreadnought hoaxers in their Abyssinian regalia, with Virginia Woolf on the far left. PUBLIC DOMAIN

EVEN A PERSON RUSHING FOR a tight connection at Paddington Station, London, might have stopped to stare at a strange group making its way onto the train to Weymouth on February 7, 1910. Four people, men of foreign extraction, by all appearances, with luxuriant beards, patterned…

Source: When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

6 thoughts on “When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

  1. Had Virginia Woolf lived today, she would be exposing racism rather than embracing it and, I’m sure, she would be more elegant in handling the subject. If the author feels she should condemn Edwardian attitude towards Africans, she should limit herself to one condemnation per article. This one was peppered with annoying political correctness.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I can imagine the authorities being embarrassed by falling for the hoax. I was less impressed by Woolf deciding to turn it into something different later though.
    Hard to judge those times by modern standards though. Most people of all classes had little regard for those with dark skin, in 1910.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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