London’s first council housing: the ‘Richmond Experiment’ and its ‘People’s Champion’ | Municipal Dreams

manor-grove-11You don’t generally look to Richmond upon Thames for political radicalism and pioneering social reform.  But look again – at a street of modest Victorian terraced housing: Manor Grove in North Sheen.  This was the first council housing in London.  It was built through the efforts of…

via London’s first council housing: the ‘Richmond Experiment’ and its ‘People’s Champion’ | Municipal Dreams

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#RAF100 | 9 Iconic Aircraft From The Battle Of Britain

First Night History celebrates 100 years of the Royal Air Force with this post from the Imperial War Museum.

1. SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE
The Spitfire was the iconic aircraft of the Battle of Britain and became the symbol of British defiance in the air. Designed by Reginald Mitchell, it had an advanced all-metal airframe, making it light and strong. It took longer to build than the Hurricane and was less sturdy, but it was faster and had a responsiveness which impressed all who flew it. Crucially, it was a match for…supermarine

via 9 Iconic Aircraft From The Battle Of Britain | Imperial War Museums

easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

easter egg, handmade easter egg, handmade © IWM (EPH 641)

Physical description
A carved wooden Easter egg, in two halves, depicting on one side a painted rural scene with cottage, fields, trees and a blue sky, on the other side are large letters in gold…

via easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

“Frankly, I enjoyed the war.” Totally crazy story of Victoria Cross hero

Wiart in Cairo, Egypt in 1943

Wiart in Cairo, Egypt in 1943

“We’re going to have to ditch, sir, prepare for a landing on water!” was the last thing that the “Unkillable Soldier” Major-General Adrian Carton de Wiart VC heard from the cockpit of the Wellington bomber that was supposed to be…

via Frankly, I enjoyed the war. Totally crazy story of Victoria Cross hero who tore off his own fingers, lost an eye, was shot in the head & still went back for more

Captain Robert Falcon Scott | Explore Royal Museums Greenwich

Captain Robert Falcon Scott was the first British explorer to reach the South Pole and explore Antarctica extensively by land in the early 1900s.

The celebrated explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868–1912) also famously took part in the race to claim the South Pole in 1911, but sadly failed in his mission and died on his return journey…

via Captain Robert Falcon Scott | Explore Royal Museums Greenwich

Henrietta Lacks, Whose Cells Led to a Medical Revolution

Henrietta Lacks in a family photo. HeLa, the cell line named for her, has been at the core of treatments for ailments like hemophilia, herpes, influenza and leukemia. Lacks Family/The Henrietta Lacks Foundation, via Associated Press

Henrietta Lacks in a family photo. HeLa, the cell line named for her, has been at the core of treatments for ailments like haemophilia, herpes, influenza and leukaemia. Lacks Family/The Henrietta Lacks Foundation, via Associated Press

Cancer cells were taken from her body without permission. They led to a medical revolution…

via Henrietta Lacks, Whose Cells Led to a Medical Revolution

Mary Wilkins Ellis – solentaviatrix

If you watched RAF at 100 with actor Ewan McGregor and his former RAF pilot brother Colin on BBC1 at the weekend, you will have seen the siblings interview this indomitable lady alongside the late Joy Lofthouse. She is a year older than the RAF. And she lives a few miles down the road from me on the Isle of Wight.

Mary Wilkins Ellis in ATA uniform 1941

Mary Wilkins Ellis in ATA uniform 1941

Mary Wilkins grew up in a farming family in Brize Norton, Oxfordshire. She learned to fly at Witney and Oxford Aero Club, where the directors were Mrs. Beatrice Macdonald and Mr. K. E. Walters.

On 15th March 1939, she flew B.A. Swallow G-AFGE for the first time. She flew it again…

via Mary Wilkins Ellis – solentaviatrix

Lies, Damned Lies and the 1877 Boat Race | Re-post

An artist’s view of the finish of the 1877 Oxford – Cambridge Boat Race.

An artist’s view of the finish of the 1877 Oxford – Cambridge Boat Race.

This is a particularly fascinating post for me as my maternal great-grandfather, Benedict Hoskyns, rowed for Cambridge in 1877. The oar he used is still in the family.

via Lies, Damned Lies and the 1877 Boat Race | First Night History

This Battle of Britain pilot is set to fly a Spitfire again at the age of 96

allanscottRAFAs the Royal Air Force prepares to celebrate its centenary, Second World War Spitfire ace Allan Scott tells Dean Kirby why he is still flying high at the age of 96.

At his bungalow in the heart of rural Shropshire, Squadron Leader Allan Scott is gazing at a portrait of himself as a young man wearing the distinctive blue uniform of the Royal Air Force.

The face that beam’s back at the 96-year-old is…

via This Battle of Britain pilot is set to fly a Spitfire again at the age of 96 – The i – iweekend #26

The face of history – A visit to Haddon Hall III | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Kathleen Manners, 9th Duchess of Rutland. Sketch for an oil painting by Laura Knight.

Kathleen Manners, 9th Duchess of Rutland. Sketch for an oil painting by Laura Knight.

Although there are the grand tapestries, Great Hall and Long Gallery, as well as all the trappings of magnificence, there are corners of Haddon Hall that do not feel like a grand and glorious Country House. They simply feel like home. Being midwinter, I think we may have seen the interior, at least, at its best… though I would love to see the gardens in summer. Roaring fires, the scent of pine and woodsmoke hanging, heavy as incense, in the air of low-ceilinged rooms, all make the place…

via The face of history – A visit to Haddon Hall III | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Henry Mayhew, The London Vagabond | Spitalfields Life

Henrymayhew

When Henry Mayhew died in 1887, one newspaper noted ‘The chief impression created in the public mind was one of surprise that he should still be alive.’ Yet nearly forty years earlier, his London Labour & the London Poor had gripped the country, confronting it with the voices…

via Henry Mayhew, The London Vagabond | Spitalfields Life

In World War II, Boeing Built a Fake Rooftop Town to Hide Its Factory Beneath From Potential Air Strike by the Japanese ~ vintage everyday

On the roof of Boeing Plant 2, camouflage trees and structures were shorter than a person.

On the roof of Boeing Plant 2, camouflage trees and structures were shorter than a person.

During World War II, a strange, house-filled neighbourhood could be seen in the middle of an industrial area from the air. A close-up look would reveal that it was camouflage for Boeing’s Plant No. 2, where thousands of B-17 bombers were produced.

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese submarines were…

via In World War II, Boeing Built a Fake Rooftop Town to Hide Its Factory Beneath From Potential Air Strike by the Japanese ~ vintage everyday

Obituary: Millie Dunn Veasey, pioneering sergeant turned rights activist – BBC News

6888TH MONUMENT COMMITTEE Millie Dunn Veasey and her unit's contribution to WW2 was "huge", one expert said

6888TH MONUMENT COMMITTEE Millie Dunn Veasey and her unit’s contribution to WW2 was “huge”, one expert said

via Obituary: Millie Dunn Veasey, pioneering sergeant turned rights activist – BBC News

On this day… – WCH On This Day

irishfamineOn this day, 17 March 1846, Saint Patrick’s Day, one of the first shipments of famine refugees left Dublin for New York. During the next five years more than a…

via On this day… – WCH On This Day

Lady Mary Bankes and the Siege of Corfe Castle | W.U Hstry

‘Courage even above her sex’, this statement immortalised on a plaque as part of a eulogy for Lady Mary Bankes by her son Sir Ralph Bankes is located in St Martin’s Church in Ruislip,…

Source: Lady Mary Bankes and the Siege of Corfe Castle | W.U Hstry