Eleanor Marx: ‘Mother of socialist feminism’ |

Eleanor Marx has been called the ‘mother of socialist feminism’. She was a political agitator, literary translator, actress and campaigner for workers’ rights – deserving of…

Source: Eleanor Marx: ‘Mother of socialist feminism’ |

May 10, 1941, Prisoner #7 – Today in History

At the end of WWI, Rudolf Walter Richard Hess enrolled in the University of Munich.  He’d been wounded several times in the Great War, serving in the 7th Bavarian Field Artillery Regiment. As a student, Hess studied geopolitics under Karl Haushofer, an early proponent of “Lebensraum” (“living space”), the philosophy which later became…

Source: May 10, 1941, Prisoner #7 – Today in History

Hungary, 1956 — John Sadovy | Iconic Photos

Photojournalism’s most memorable images were crafted by the right men at the right moment. John Sadovy was one of those. One of few photojournalists who got into Hungary during its tumultuous…

Source: Hungary, 1956 — John Sadovy | Iconic Photos

The Last Empress Dowager | toritto

It is the year 1861 in the Western calendar while in China the Xianfeng Emperor lay dying.   He was the ninth Emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty and he was but thirty years old.  Each Emperor, upon…

Source: The Last Empress Dowager | toritto

V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

Re-blog from 8 May 2015

Benedicta Leigh 1922—2000 [photo: David Sim]

My mother, Benedicta Leigh, was in her late teens when the Second World War broke out. She signed up to be a VAD [Voluntary Aid Detachment] nurse and was working at a hospital in London when German…

Source: V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Children of Stalin | toritto

Joe Stalin died on March 5, 1953.  I was almost twelve years old at the time. While such things rarely mattered to kids in middle school, then called junior high, Stalin’s death was the talk …

Source: Children of Stalin | toritto

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Henry VII’s four-poster bed thrown out & sold for just £2,200

Over time, some ancient artifacts and art pieces have gotten thrown out by accident. Some pieces have even been sold by mistake as well. The most recent ar…

Source: Henry VII’s four-poster bed thrown out & sold for just £2,200 – but now it’s confirmed as the real thing – could be worth £20 million

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Casual Racism… Anti-Semitism in the Regency – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

In 1782, the German tourist, Karl Philipp Moritz toured England on foot and by stagecoach. He was a liberal Anglophile clergyman who loved the countryside and architecture of England but had mixed …

Source: Casual Racism… Anti-Semitism in the Regency – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

A Fond Farewell to England’s Prefab WWII Bungalows – Atlas Obscura

For decades, residents of the Excalibur Estate, London’s last community of post-World War II, prefabricated houses, have been fighting against property developers and hostile local authorities to save their lovely bungalows from demolition.

This fight has proven to be in vain, as, driven by rising land values, Lewisham Council started to pull them down in…

Source: A Fond Farewell to England’s Prefab WWII Bungalows – Atlas Obscura

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Improving the Nation

slack_imageIn his new book, The Invention of Improvement, Paul Slack sets out to do two things: first, to trace the ‘notion of improvement’ in seventeenth-century ‘public discourse’ (vii) in England; and seco…

Source: Improving the Nation

The History Girls: Odette by Julie Summers

There are very few characters from the Second World War who are known by their first names but Odette is one of them. Probably the most famous female Special Operations Executive (SOE) agent to survive was born this day in 1912. She was christened Odette Marie Celine Brailly in Amiens and remarkably was blind for nearly…

Source: The History Girls: Odette by Julie Summers

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

The Forgotten American Missionaries of Pyongyang – Atlas Obscura

American missionaries’ residences on the hill and a church field day on the current site of Kim Il Sung Square, 1921. PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

It may be difficult to imagine from the perspective of the 21st century, but the North Korean capital city of Pyongyang once had at its center a community of Americans—Christian missionaries who lived there from 1895 to 1942.

Source: The Forgotten American Missionaries of Pyongyang – Atlas Obscura

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

 

On this day: a nuclear disaster in the USSR | In Times Gone By…

This is the first picture taken of the destroyed nuclear reactor in Chernobyl (Chornobyl in Ukrainian), Ukraine. 27th April, 1986. Taken from a helicopter flying over to assess the damage, the imag…

Source: On this day: a nuclear disaster in the USSR | In Times Gone By…

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Learning from the Gracchi – the “First Socialists” | toritto

A lesson from history for today’s politics It is the year 135B. C  .in the Roman Republic. The Carthaginians had been finally defeated. The Roman Republic itself was already some 375 years ol…

Source: Learning from the Gracchi – the “First Socialists” | toritto

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Death at the Needle: The Tragedy of Victorian Seamstress Mary Walkley – Mimi Matthews

The Seamstress by Josef Gisela, 1897

“Sir,—I am a dressmaker, living in a large West-end house of business. I work in a crowded room with twenty-eight others. This morning one of my companions was found dead in her bed, and we all of …

Source: Death at the Needle: The Tragedy of Victorian Seamstress Mary Walkley – Mimi Matthews