To His Son Benedict from the Tower of London by John Hoskyns

19th-century engraving of The Trusty Servant, from the 1579 painting by John Hoskins [sic]

The epigram attached to the Hoskyns family is ‘Imprison thy tongue or it will thee.’ In other words, keep your trap shut or you’ll end up in trouble! His descendants, which include the owner of this blog, still have similar problems because we tend to open our mouths when it would be prudent to keep our thoughts to ourselves. John Hoskyns was imprisoned at the same time as John Aubrey, who mentions him in Brief Lives.

1614
To His Son Benedict from the Tower of London by John Hoskyns 1614

Sweet Benedict, whilst thou art young,
And know’st not yet the use of tongue,
Keep it in thrall whilst thou art free:
Imprison it or it will thee.

John Hoskyns (1566-1638)

© Sarah Vernon

Intermission Story (4) – A Japanese Ace | Pacific Paratrooper

“In the ocean of the military, reflective of all distinguished pilots, an honored Buddhist person.”  So translates the name awarded to Japanese pilot Hiroyoshi Nishizawa following his death i…

Source: Intermission Story (4) – A Japanese Ace | Pacific Paratrooper

June 29, 1861: Pretty Woman, the Kind I’d Like To Meet – Wretched Richard’s Almanac

In 1861, sixty people boarded the St. Nicholas, a steamer that carried passengers between Baltimore and points along the Potomac – among them a Madame LaForte, a stylish young lady who spoke very l…

Source: June 29, 1861: Pretty Woman, the Kind I’d Like To Meet – Wretched Richard’s Almanac

The Intrepid ’20s Women Who Formed an All-Female Global Exploration Society – Atlas Obscura

Journalist and explorer Marguerite Harrison shares a meal with a group of Bakhtiari men. (From the documentary A Nation’s Battle for Life by Merian Cooper and Ernest Schoedsack) BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES

In August 1923, Marguerite Harrison sailed from New York bound for Constantinople. The 44-year-old had returned just five months earlier from Russia where she had been imprisoned, for a second time, on suspicions of espionage. A widowed mother of a teenage boy, Harrison had thought she would…

Source: The Intrepid ’20s Women Who Formed an All-Female Global Exploration Society – Atlas Obscura

A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

Part of the A212 road runs along one side of Crystal Palace Park, carrying traffic between the suburbs of south-east London.  However, beneath a section of the road – unbeknownst to those pas…

Source: A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

WWII Heroines: Violette Szabo | A R T L▼R K

A reblog of a reblog because the original link is no longer extant!
On the 26th of June 1921, Violette Szabo, daughter of an English cabbie and a French dressmaker was born in Paris. Raised in Britain, she married at a young age, but lost her husband when he was ki…

Source: WWII Heroines: Violette Szabo | A R T L▼R K

Quietly awaiting Armageddon: “quiver theory” and the summer of 1914. – SeanMunger.com

In the early summer of 1914, Europe had no idea what was coming its way. Are we in a similar daze today?

Source: Quietly awaiting Armageddon: “quiver theory” and the summer of 1914. – SeanMunger.com

She survived Hitler and wants to warn America – On the Front Lines of the Culture Wars

I prepared this re-blog in August last year and then completely forgot about it. Since then, of course, Donald Trump has become the President.

Austrian kids loyal to Hitler

Kitty Werthmann survived Hitler. “What I am about to tell you is something you’ve probably never heard or read in history books,” she likes to tell audiences. “I am a witness to history.  “I cannot tell you that Hitler took […]

Source: She survived Hitler and wants to warn America – On the Front Lines of the Culture Wars

The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Euricius Cordus (1486-1535);

In August 1485, Henry Tudor had just won his crown from Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field. By October of the same year, several thousand of his subjects would be dead of a mysterious…

Source: The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

George V’s Coronation 1911 — ‘…hats were waving and everybody was yelling…’ | First Night History

FROM THE ARCHIVE: 22nd June 2014

Coronation portrait by Sir Luke Fildes, 1911

Today, 22 June, in 1911, George V was crowned in Westminster Abbey. My great-aunt, Diana Thomas, née Hoskyns, was ten years old when he came to the throne. Her description of the Coronation …

Source: George V’s Coronation 1911 — ‘…hats were waving and everybody was yelling…’ | First Night History

Balfour Declaration 1. Beware Mythistory | First World War Hidden History

Possibly the most contentious centenary within the First World War was the Balfour Declaration of November 1917. It left in its wake so many controversies and is held to be the root of so much anta…

Source: Balfour Declaration 1. Beware Mythistory | First World War Hidden History

Gibraltar Evacuees in London | London Historians’ Blog

A guest post by Joe Gingell.

In May 1940 the British Government ordered the evacuation of women, children, the elderly and infirm to French Morocco to convert Gibraltar into a fully-fledged fortress…

Source: Gibraltar Evacuees in London | London Historians’ Blog

The Rare Archival Photos Behind ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ – Atlas Obscura

A crop from the 1924 panorama showing members of the Osage tribe alongside prominent local white businessmen and leaders. COURTESY ARCHIE MASON

One day in 2012, when I was visiting the Osage Nation Museum, in Oklahoma, I saw a panoramic photograph on the wall.

Taken in 1924, the picture showed a…

Source: The Rare Archival Photos Behind ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ – Atlas Obscura

People with Disabilities in Jane Austen’s England, a Guest Post by Elaine Owen | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

York Vs York: Changing Attitudes in Regency England In April, Elaine Owen shared this piece on Austen Authors. I thought it worthy of a second look.  Jane Austen did not write about disabled people…

Source: People with Disabilities in Jane Austen’s England, a Guest Post by Elaine Owen | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

On this day: the death of a war hero | In Times Gone By…

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d’honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915. A 1919 painting depicting the moment th…

Source: On this day: the death of a war hero | In Times Gone By…