How red poppies came to be given out on Memorial Day | The Cotton Boll Conspiracy

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below. W…

Source: How red poppies came to be given out on Memorial Day | The Cotton Boll Conspiracy

Hidden Women Update: WWI Camouflage in Action | The Unwritten Record

You may remember our July 2016 post about the Women’s Reserve Camouflage Corps, made up of women artists who developed camouflage for use by American troops in Europe during World War I. The websit…

Source: Hidden Women Update: WWI Camouflage in Action | The Unwritten Record

Knighthood on the Quarter-deck | The Rant Foundry

Though it was not without precedent for a Knighthood ceremony to take place on board one of His Majesty’s ships, it was a rare distinction, however, to receive the accolade on the quarter-deck as R…

Source: Knighthood on the Quarter-deck | The Rant Foundry

EDITH MUNRO: Newham pays respects to WWI nurse | HalfEatenMind

Military veterans and members of the Jewish community paid their respects this month to a Newham, east London nurse who gave her life in active service for the country at a special memorial service this past week, council magazine The Newham Mag reports.

The nurse, Edith Hilda Munro, was born in a well-off household in Hackney, the daughter of Scottish engineer John Munro, and local Leah Nathan, and had three brothers and sisters. She first began her illustrious career in the Albert Dock Seaman’s Hospital of Custom House, in the south of the London borough, before finding work with the Voluntary Aid Detachment shortly after it was founded in 1909, a group which sent nurses to treat the injured in war zones. Upon the outbreak of World War I, Munro tended to soldiers injured in…

Source: EDITH MUNRO: Newham pays respects to WWI nurse | HalfEatenMind

World War I Combat Artists – Andre Smith | The Unwritten Record

Local Identifier 111-SC-20139. Regimental Headquarters near Belleau Woods, located in the farm house known as Maison Blanc. It was occupied at the time of my visit, June 28th, 1918, by Colonel Neville of the Marines. By Captain J. Andre Smith

Among the many images drawn by Captain Andre Smith, several capture the American experience in Belleau Wood.  Belleau Wood is famous for exemplifying the courage, grit and determination of the Marine Corps which made up the 5th and 6th regiments of the 2nd Division.In early June 1918, the American 2nd Division joined with the French Army long the Marne River to drive the Germans out.  The division was…

Source: World War I Combat Artists – Andre Smith | The Unwritten Record

Santa’s Helper and the Queen’s Christmas Gift (Christmas History 16) | Windows into History

Lady Harriet Julia Jephson was an artist and writer, who wrote about her travel experiences in Notes of a Nomad, published in 1918.  The Great War hung heavy over her narrative, and she reflected upon her many acquaintances who had been lost in the war.  One in particular, caused her to remember a Christmas anecdote:

This cruel war, alas! has robbed each of a gifted son. Keith Anthony Stewart, a singularly brilliant scholar and athlete, a most lovable character and gallant soul, fell leading his platoon at Aubers Ridge on the 9th May, 1915. His noble, dauntless spirit showed itself even as a small child. At one time he had a great idea of the Navy as a future career, which Lord Galloway discouraged. One day Keith was out in a boat in Galloway Bay with his father, and the sea being very rough, poor Keith was desperately sea-sick.

“Aha, my boy,” said his father unsympathetically, “what about the Navy now?”

A small, very white face raised itself from the bottom of the boat, and…

Source: Santa’s Helper and the Queen’s Christmas Gift (Christmas History 16) | Windows into History

War Toys for Christmas: 1914-1917 | Mrs Daffodil Digresses

WAR TOYS FOR THE KIDS

Toy Makers Take Cue from War Now Raging, and Miniature Armies and Ordnance is in Style

Santa Claus will fill the stockings of Emporia boys and girls this year with guns, cannon, soldiers and warlike toys such as they never before have seen. It will be a military Christmas and the Emporia youngsters will fight the battles of the Argonne and Ypres like the real soldiers across the Atlantic, only the soldiers will be tin and the guns small and harmless.

The Emporia stores have their toys on display this week and in their big stock are many war implements. Miniature Krupp guns will slaughter tin soldiers in front of the fireplace Christmas Day, and the boys will imitate the Belgians and Germans with an assortment of…

Source: War Toys for Christmas: 1914-1917 | Mrs Daffodil Digresses

The Jewish Fascist

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Ettore-Ovazza

Ettore Ovazza and Benito Mussolini

Ettore Ovazza was one of three brothers born into a wealthy and influential  family in Turin. The Ovazza were one of Italy’s leading banking families with all the privilege and power that comes with it.

Ettore was born in 1892 and grew up with everything early 20th century Italy had to give. He wanted for nothing.

The Ovazza were Jewish. At the time Jews living in Italy were the most assimilated in Europe. Of course there were few of them – perhaps 0.01% of the population in this predominantly Roman Catholic country.

Italian Jews benefitted from the absence of legal and social disadvantages that existed elsewhere. They spoke Italian or the local dialect rather than the Yiddish or Ladino that many of their European coreligionists spoke. They were engaged in politics, served at high rates in the military, and found success in every skilled…

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Colorised Stereographs of The Russo-Japanese War (1905) | The Public Domain Review

russo-jap-war-bannerA selection of colorised stereographs depicting Japanese soldiers and camp life during the Russo-Japanese war of 1904-1905. A result of a rivalry between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over the control of areas in Manchuria and Korea, the war would introduce a number of features that came to define 20th-century politics and warfare. It was on its battlefields that many technological innovations of the Industrial Revolution first became used in warfare on a mass scale – including modern armaments, such as rapid firing artillery and machine guns – paving the way for the devastation of the WW1 in the following decade. In the end, the Japanese victory took the West by surprise and Russia was forced to forfeit its expansion policy in the Far East, with Japan proving it was a force to be reckoned with. As for Russia, the many defeats suffered by the country led to discontent over the Romanov autocracy, and after World War I contributed to the February Revolution of 1917…

Source: Colorised Stereographs of The Russo-Japanese War (1905) | The Public Domain Review

The Murder of Jean Joures – July 31, 1914

We need a million such men today to halt the tide.

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 Jean Joures

“What will the future be like, when the billions now thrown away in preparation for war are spent on useful things to increase the well-being of people, on the construction of decent houses for workers, on improving transportation, on reclaiming the land? The fever of imperialism has become a sickness. It is the disease of a badly run society which does not know how to use its energies at home.”

Oh to hear such words in the Presidential debates to come!  Written more than a century ago, we are no closer to them now than we were then.

Jean Jaures was the leader of the French Socialists, one the first true social democrats.

A brilliant orator and philosopher,  co-founder and Editor of the newspaper L’Humanite, leader of the French Section of the Worker’s International, he had spent decades supporting workers in their daily struggles.

Above all he was…

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Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to the Austro-Hungarian Mission, 25 July 1914 – Part IV | The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014

Originally posted on The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014.

Leopold Count Berchtold

On 25 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), circulated a memoir to all Austro-Hungarian diplomatic missions. The memoir formed the basis of Austria-Hungary’s view of Serbia, and the Dual Monarchy’s rational during the July Crisis. From the Austro-Hungarian perspective, it lists the different forms of Serbian aggression endured since the beginning of the century, culminating in the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife at Sarajevo. The following is part IV of the memoir.

Circular Note to the Austro-Hungarian Mission. Vienna, 25 July 1914.

A few months previously, research with regard to treasonable propaganda had been instituted on Luka Aljinovicz’s account. In the course of these investigations three witnesses had testified against Aljinovicz, who, they said had in 1913 received 100 dinar from the Narodna odbrana for purposes of propaganda, but more especially for an attempt upon the life of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and a secret student society had given him the same sum.

This shows how the criminal agitation of the Narodna odbrana was recently concentrated upon the person of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

All these facts lead to the conclusion that the Narodjia odbrana, and the elements hostile to Austria-Hungary grouped around it, had recently considered the…

via Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to the Austro-Hungarian Mission, 25 July 1914 – Part IV | The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014.

Fine Ships and Gallant Sailors | barbdrummondbooks

Originally posted on barbdrummondbooks.

I grew up in Australia where ANZAC Day is an annual holiday, but I had never heard of this battle. But if it hadn’t happened, the Australians and New Zealanders might not have made it to Gallipoli, and the history of the First World War could have turned out very . book is based on the journal of a friend’s grandfather who signed on to deliver Australia’s first light cruiser, the HMAS Sydney,  in 1913 and ended up in the middle of the first running gun battle of the First World War against the raider/pirate, the German SMS Emden.The Sydney was escorting the first of the ANZAC fleet from Freemantle to Gallipoli, which had been delayed repeatedly due to the risk of attack from the Emden. When the Emden attacked the telegraph station…

via Fine Ships and Gallant Sailors | barbdrummondbooks.

Tearless the Enemies of Peace

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Dalton Trumbo with his wife Cleo at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings in 1947.

“World War I began like a Summer festival – all billowing skirts and golden epaulets. Millions upon millions cheered from the sidewalks while plumed Imperial Highnesses, Serenities and Field Marshals and other such fools paraded thorugh the capital cities of Europe at the head of their shining legions.

It was a season of generosities, a time for boasts, bands, poems, songs, innocent prayers. It was an August made palpitant and breathless by the pre-nuptial nights of young gentlemen officers and the girls they left permanently behind.  One of the Highland regiments went over the top in its first battle behind forty kilted bagpipers skirling away for all they were worth – at machine guns.

Nine million corpses later, when the bands stopped and the Serenities started running, the wail of bagpipes would never again sound…

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