When Australian women were accidentally given the vote. | In Times Gone By…

Australian suffragettes in London in 1911

In the nineteenth century, in the state of Victoria in Australia, the Electoral Act 1863 was passed. According to the act, “all persons” who ow…

Source: When Australian women were accidentally given the vote. | In Times Gone By…

On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard | In Times Gone By…

In 1905

In 1905 Kate Sheppard, New Zealand’s most famous suffragette, died on the 13th of July, 1934. Born to Scottish parents in England in 1847, Sheppard moved to New Zealand in 1869. She became a …

Source: On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard | In Times Gone By…

On this day: Emily Davison’s collision with a racehorse | In Times Gone By…

On the 4th of June, 1913 militant suffragette Emily Davison rushed onto the racetrack at the Epsom Derby, running in front of a racehorse. She was trampled by the horse and died four days later. It…

Source: On this day: Emily Davison’s collision with a racehorse | In Times Gone By…

Elizabeth Piper Ensley – Organizing African-American Suffragists

Elizabeth Piper Ensley c. 1900

Yesterday, I posted an article on Facebook by Lynn Yaeger at Vogue entitled The African-American Suffragists History Forgot. It was a good, short article which gave names of a number of African-Ame…

Source: Elizabeth Piper Ensley – Organizing African-American Suffragists

Parliament and Votes for Women

London Historians' Blog

A guest post by LH Member Anne Carwardine.

Source: Parliamentary Archives. Source: Parliamentary Archives.

As a woman, if I had wanted to observe proceedings in Parliament two hundred years ago I would have had to crane my neck and peer down through a ventilation shaft. One hundred years ago I would have been in the Ladies Gallery, high above the Speaker’s Chair, with a heavy metal grille blocking much of my view and making it difficult to focus. (Campaigner Millicent Fawcett described this as like looking through a gigantic pair of spectacles which did not fit).

On a recent tour of Parliament, which focussed on connections with the Votes for Women campaign, the group I was in (mostly women) stood on the floor of the House of Commons looking up at the Ladies’ Gallery and wondering what it would have been like to be confined there.

In October 1908 Muriel Matters and…

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Ace History News | SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: Fanny Bullock Workman one of the first female Professional Mountaineer’s

Originally posted on Ace History News.

Fanny Bullock Workman (1859–1925) was an American geographer, cartographer, explorer, travel writer, and mountaineer, notably in the Himalayas. She was one of the first female professional mountaineers; she not only explored but also wrote about her adventures.

She set several women’s altitude records, published eight travel books with her husband, and championed women’s rights and women’s suffrage. Educated in the finest schools available to women, she was introduced to climbing in New Hampshire. She married William Hunter Workman, and traveled the world with him. The couple had two children, but left them in schools and with nurses. Workman saw herself as…

via Ace History News | SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: Fanny Bullock Workman one of the first female Professional Mountaineer’s .