A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Lighter Side Of The Peninsular Campaign

Originally posted on A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life.

In this year of the Waterloo bicentenary, there are so many illuminating posts on various historical sites, detailing the events and describing the countless other military engagements that have led to the ultimate Allied victory against Napoleonic France.

I have taken the liberty to address a lighter side of the gruesome conflict that had gripped Europe for such a length of time. In doing so, I am perhaps reinforcing the stereotype. It is often said of Regency aficionados that they view the era through rose-tinted glasses. That they choose to focus on the glamour, the balls, the manners, the high-society people in elegant apparel – whilst ignoring the dark realities of the time, such as the plight of the dispossessed, the lengthy wars that have crippled the country or the plain fact that even the muslin-clad ladies whose carefree lifestyle they admire were not immune to the tragedies of death in childbirth or the ravaging effects of...

via A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Lighter Side Of The Peninsular Campaign.

June 20 1815: News of Waterloo Reaches London

pastnow

At 11 o’clock on the night of 21 June [1815] a dirty travelling-coach rolled into St James’s Square and came to a halt outside No. 18. Passers-by stopped and stared with curiosity at two military colours, their staffs topped with gilded Napoleonic eagles, which protruded from one of the coach windows. Its occupant, Major Henry Percy, one of Wellington’s aides-de-camp, alighted and bounded up the steps of Castlereagh’s house. On being informed that the Foreign Secretary was dining with Mr Edmund Boehm at No. 16, along with the Prince Regent and Lord Liverpool, Percy seized the two French colours and went to find him there. A moment later he burst into the dining room, threw the colours at the feet of the Prince Regent and announced that Wellington had won a great victory over Napoleon, who had fled the field followed by the remnants of his shattered army. Before he had…

View original post 53 more words

Margaret Tolmie – another ‘Waterloo Child’

All Things Georgian

The Battle of Waterloo was hard fought, and hard won by the Allied Forces. In the aftermath, as night fell, the men who were still able to answered the roll call of their names. The women travelling in the train of the army listened for news, desperately wanting to hear their loved ones listed as living.

The Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815 by Denis Dighton (painted in 1816) NT; (c) National Trust, Plas Newydd; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation The Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815 by Denis Dighton (painted in 1816)
NT; (c) National Trust, Plas Newydd; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

One such woman was young Mrs Tolmie: daughter of a corporal in the Royal North British Dragoons (the Scots Greys), she had travelled with the army, working as a nurse in Portugal and tending to the sick and injured. One man, whose life she had saved, married her in between battles. That man was Adam Tolmie, either a trooper in the same regiment as her father by the time…

View original post 1,234 more words

A selection of Waterloo memorabilia.

Adventures In Historyland

In 1815 the Duke of Wellington was the man everybody wanted to know about, though even before Waterloo his face had already been glazed onto plates and China tea services, now he had defeated Napoleon and his place in history was secure and so was his celebrity.

View original post 663 more words

German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians – Europe – World – The Independent

Originally posted in The Independent.

He died fighting for Britain 200 years ago at the Battle of Waterloo, felled by a French musket ball that lodged in his ribs. But the remains of the German soldier, believed to be those of Private Friedrich Brandt, are not at rest.

Instead, they are on display in a Belgian museum, part of an exhibition commemorating the bicentenary of the great battle. The decision to show the remains – discovered under a car park near the Lion Mound area of the battlefield in 2012 – has shocked historians, who are now campaigning for them to be reinterred.

Military historian Rob Schäfer said: “It doesn’t have to be a military [funeral], just a dignified funeral. He can go home to Hanover … a burial in England would be great. Anything but being in a display box.”

The remains were put on show on 23 May at the Waterloo Memorial 1815 in the Belgian province of Walloon Brabant. While the institution insists the identity of the dead soldier is unknown, it is widely believed the remains are those of Brandt, a 23-year-old hunchback from Hanover, in the King’s German Legion – exiled Hanoverians who fought as part of  the Duke of Wellington’s army and who trained at…

via German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians – Europe – World – The Independent.

Book Review: Waterloo 1815 (1) Quatre Bras by John Franklin.

Adventures In Historyland

Waterloo 1815 (1) Quatre Bras.

Paperback: 96 pages
Publisher: Osprey Publishing (November 18, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1472803639
ISBN-13: 978-1472803634
http://www.amazon.com/Waterloo-1815-1-Quatre-Bras/dp/1472803639
515f9iOoSlL
Osprey’s multi volume contribution to the 200th anniversary of Waterloo kicks of with the Battle of Quatre Bras. Fought on the 16th of June 1815, it is good to bear in mind that this battle two has reached its bicentenary.
A barrel straight narrative dominates this account of a very confusing battle. This precursor to Waterloo has always defied an easy analysis because it has no real form and eludes clear definition like the shape of water. Therefore the more focused histories that are published the better. However it has been continuously overshadowed by the main battle on the 18th.

I was very pleased with this book, it’s not showy, it’s a nuts and bolts sort of account and supremely detailed, with an emphasis on the Dutch and Brunswick…

View original post 299 more words

Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015

First Night History

Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler
Prints of Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler are available to buy at FirstNightVintage

Related


Originally posted on Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

A call is going out to the nation and beyond to find descendants of those who fought in the Battle of Waterloo, the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe, ahead of the 200th anniversary of the Battle in 2015.

On 18th June 1815, one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever was fought by the Duke of Wellington and his allied army, bringing to an end a long campaign against the might of Napoleon Bonaparte. Over rolling countryside between two ridges, 11 miles south of Brussels, the entire course of European history changed as Napoleon was defeated, ending his leadership of the French Empire. Waterloo literally means ‘wet meadow’ and the condition of the…

View original post 70 more words

The Funeral of Wellington

London Historians' Blog

wellington by lawrence Wellington by Thos. Lawrence

This day in 1852, Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, was laid to rest in St Paul’s, having died on 14 September, aged 83. Nearly half a century after Nelson’s ceremony and almost four decades of relative peace across land and sea following Waterloo, Wellington’s state funeral was the most extraordinary street procession that Londoners could remember. It even caused the Lord Mayor’s parade to be cancelled for the only time ever.

Prior to tranquil semi-retirement in Kent, the Iron Duke had become a deeply unpopular politician and Prime Minister. During a period characterised by Reform, Wellington – deeply conservative – set is face against the inexorable tide of popular emancipation. He genuinely felt that the existing settlement could not be further perfected and famously was stoned in his house and in his carriage. Even the equestrian statue of the hero of Waterloo for the Wellington Arch had been…

View original post 217 more words

Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015

Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler
Prints of Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler are available to buy at FirstNightVintage

Related


Originally posted on Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

A call is going out to the nation and beyond to find descendants of those who fought in the Battle of Waterloo, the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe, ahead of the 200th anniversary of the Battle in 2015.

On 18th June 1815, one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever was fought by the Duke of Wellington and his allied army, bringing to an end a long campaign against the might of Napoleon Bonaparte. Over rolling countryside between two ridges, 11 miles south of Brussels, the entire course of European history changed as Napoleon was defeated, ending his leadership of the French Empire. Waterloo literally means ‘wet meadow’ and the condition of the ground on the day was such that shoes and cannon balls simply disappeared by their hundreds into the mud.

Though the Duke was outnumbered in both men and cannon, his tactical skill and staying power resulted in an outcome that decided the future of Europe, becoming a milestone in…

via Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

Napoleon sunken weapons discovered on the memory of his abdication

Originally posted on Luxor Times

Dr. Mamdouh El Damaty, Minister of Antiquities and Heritage, announced the find of a group of antiquities weapons vary between guns and rifles dated back to 18th century and they were discovered under the Mediterranean Sea waters near the modern harbour of Alexandria.

Today [22 June] marks the date of Napoleon Bonaparte’s last abdication in 1815, after his defeat in Waterloo.

According to the minister, the weapons were discovered during the underwater survey by the Russian mission in cooperation with the Ministry of Antiquities in search for sunken ships and remains of submerged harbours in the area to the North and North West of Pharos Island including the Eastern harbour.

Dr. El Damaty added that the discovered weapons were probably on one of the French campaign ships known as “Patriot” which had sunk entering Alexandria’s west harbour then.

This find will lead to more studies and underwater search for more antiquities to reveal more details on that era…

via Napoleon sunken weapons discovered on the memory of his abdication.