On this day: Svetlana Alliluyeva defects | In Times Gone By…

On the 6th of March, 1967, Svetlana Alliluyeva, daughter of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, approached the US embassy in New Delhi and asked for political asylum. She is seen below arriving in the U…

Source: On this day: Svetlana Alliluyeva defects | In Times Gone By…

On this day: the murder of Hulda Stumpf | In Times Gone By…

American missionary Hulda Stumpf was murdered in Kijabe, Kenya on the 3rd of January, 1930. Stumpf, who had spoken out in opposition to Female Genital Mutilation, a widespread and often life-threat…

Source: On this day: the murder of Hulda Stumpf | In Times Gone By…

On this day: a prisoner of war | In Times Gone By…

Treatment of prisoners of war in the United States during the Civil War was often harsh, with prisons on both sides overcrowded, and with very few resources available. Food was scarce and thousands…

Source: On this day: a prisoner of war | In Times Gone By…

September 11

In Times Gone By...

New York Fire Department McSorley’s September 11 2009 Sonya Heaney.

(Apologies for the pictures – we weren’t trying to win photography awards here!)

In 2009, when we were in New York, we went to visit the Ukrainian district of Manhattan. There’s a shop, a museum, a church, and a famous restaurant that is in all the guidebooks.

However, what we didn’t know until we got there was that the pub next door to the shop – McSorley’s – is the place the New York firefighters gather on September 11, because of some story about a fireman killed that horrible day said he’d meet everyone there.

So we dropped by for a drink, only to find all these men and women who were involved in the horror of the Twin Towers collapse there. The pub stops usual functioning that day and just stocks the top of the bar with glasses of beer.

We were the only non-US fire-fighting, military people there…

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On this day: Great Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar

In Times Gone By...

On the 2nd of September, 1752, Great Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar. Most of Western Europe had adopted the calendar some two centuries earlier, changing from the Julian calendar.

Included in this reform was the British Empire, including parts of what is now the United States.

The Julian calendar is still used alongside the Gregorian calendar in some parts of the world, which is the reason some countries in the east of Europe celebrate Easter and Christmas on different dates.

The Gregorian Calendar

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On this day: the Black Tom explosion

In Times Gone By...

Aftermath of the Black Tom explosion, an act of sabotage on American ammunition supplies by German agents which took place on July 30, 1916 in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Black Tom pier photographed on the 31st of July, 1916, a day and a half after the explosion.

On the 30th of July, 1916, German agents blew up a pier in New Jersey, USA in an attempt to sabotage American-made munitions intended for World War One.

The worst of the explosions took place at 2:08am, by which point some guards had fled at the sight of fire, knowing what was to come.

The explosion was so great some of the fragments became lodged in the Statue of Liberty, and a clock was stopped over a mile away. The time was frozen at 2:12am.

Map of Jersey City, NJ circa 1905 showing location of Black Tom.

It is estimated that seven people were killed. Hundreds were injured, and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia and Maryland.

It was later revealed that a Slovak immigrant, who had earlier served in the US Army, was responsible for the explosions, and…

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On this day: the Battle of Raymond in 1863

In Times Gone By...

The Battle of Raymond was fought on May 12, 1863.

The Battle of Raymond, part of the US Civil War, took place on the 12th of May, 1863, near Raymond, Mississippi. It resulted in a Union victory.

The Confederates lost 100 soldiers and the Union lost 68.

Though not a large battle compared to many others, it had a significant impact on the Vicksburg Campaign.

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On this day: the Hindenburg in New Jersey in 1936

In Times Gone By...

The German zeppelin Hindenburg trundles into the U.S. Navy’s hangar at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on the 9th of May, 1936. The rigid airship had just set a record for its first north Atlantic crossing, the first leg of ten scheduled round trips between Germany and America.

The disaster that saw the destruction of the airship happened just short of a year later, on the 6th of May, 1937.

Source

The German-built zeppelin Hindenburg trundles into the U.S. Navy hangar, its nose hooked to the mobile mooring tower, at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 9, 1936.

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On this day: The Mỹ Lai Massacre

In Times Gone By...

Vietnamese women and children in Mỹ Lai before being killed in the massacre, March 16, 1968.[13] According to court testimony, they were killed seconds after the photo was taken.

Apparently taken moments before they were killed.

I’m not even going to try and summarise this one. Below is a little bit from an article about it:

Unidentified bodies near burning house. My Lai, Vietnam. March 16, 1968.

The Mỹ Lai Massacre was the Vietnam War mass killing of between 347 and 504 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam on March 16, 1968. It was committed by U.S. Army soldiers from the Company C of the 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Brigade of the 23rd (America) Infantry Division.

 Photo taken by United States Army photographer Ronald L. Haeberle on March 16, 1968 in the aftermath of the My Lai massacre showing mostly women and children dead on a road.

Women and children killed.

Victims included men, women, children, and infants. Some of the women were gang-raped and their bodies mutilated.

Pfc. Mauro, Pfc Carter, and SP4 Widmer (Carter shot himself in the foot during the My Lai massacre)SP4 Dustin setting fire to dwelling (during the My Lai massacre)

One soldier shot himself in the foot; another sets a building on fire.

Twenty-six soldiers were charged with criminal offences, but only Lieutenant William Calley Jr., a platoon leader in C Company, was convicted.

Found guilty of killing 22 villagers, he was originally given a life sentence, but served only three…

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“The acutest, the astutest, the archest enemy of southern slavery that ever existed”

Author Adrienne Morris

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John Quincy Adams. Shall we bow our heads for an early nap before discussing a white dead president? It’s kind of superficial to judge a person because they’re white and dead, don’t you think?John Quincy was pretty cute (okay that’s superficial) as a young guy, but he was much more than that.

You know how we always love to trash kids who have famous parents?We say they got where they got because their father knew, say, George Washington, but a meeting with a president doesn’t always assure you a brilliant career. John Quincy started his brilliant career at the age of 14. Yes, fourteen. He accompanied Francis Dana as a secretary on a mission to Saint Petersburg. (WIKI)

Do you know any fourteen-year-olds? How many impress foreign diplomats and presidents? Well, maybe Justin Beiber did in his prime, but if you check out John Quincy’s love poems to…

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