Lambert Simnel and Edward V | Matt’s History Blog

pitt-006-hardback-dust-jacket-bookshelfWhen I wrote The Survival of the Princes in the Tower, I posited a theory, one of many alternatives offered. This particular idea has grown on me ever since, and I find myself unable to shake it off. I’m beginning to convince myself that the 1487 Lambert Simnel Affair was never an uprising in favour of Edward, Earl of Warwick, as history tells us. I think I’m certain I believe it was a revolt in support of Edward V, the elder of the Princes in the Tower. Sounds crazy? Just bear with me…

via Lambert Simnel and Edward V | Matt’s History Blog

The Spanish Armada of 1588 – just history posts

The Spanish Armada is one of the most famous events in English history, and a story that many can recount. The terrible Spanish tried to invade to depose the beloved Elizabeth I, but due to English…

Source: The Spanish Armada of 1588 – just history posts

The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Euricius Cordus (1486-1535);

In August 1485, Henry Tudor had just won his crown from Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field. By October of the same year, several thousand of his subjects would be dead of a mysterious…

Source: The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

‘Bloody Mary’ or just Mary I? | W.U Hstry

maria_tudor1

The brutal personality of Mary I of England (1553-1558) has countlessly been regurgitated in historiography on the Tudor period. “Bloody Mary” is a name we know a lot more than Mary I, and the associations we link with this cause us to have one limited perspective on her personality as a monarch and the nature of her rule as a whole.

Admittedly, her actions in her own religious and political legislation show her hatred of what she saw…

Source: ‘Bloody Mary’ or just Mary I? | W.U Hstry

Celebrating Sir Francis Drake

On This Day – 21 April 1509

The Mad Monarchist: Princely Profile: Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, “Ipse Rex”

Originally posted on The Mad Monarchist

Known as the personification of the problems in the Catholic Church of his time, Cardinal Wolsey was worldly, wealthy and ambitious. Yet, like most figures of the Renaissance or any period in history Wolsey had his good points as well as his failings. He rose to prominence during the reign of King Henry VII, founder of the Tudor dynasty and was a major figure at court as well as acting as an envoy to the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian. When Henry VIII came to the throne Wolsey’s star was to rise even higher, and the young king had complete trust in the clever churchman. One way this came about was mutual ambition. Henry VIII wanted power and glory and would abide no one who tried to discourage him. Wolsey realized this and was always eager…

Read more: The Mad Monarchist: Princely Profile: Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, “Ipse Rex”.