Timeless Mystery: How Could a Swiss Ring-Watch End up in a Sealed Ming Dynasty Tomb?

Originally posted on Epoch Times.

A file photo of a Ming Dynasty mausoleum (Axz66/iStock)

The universe is full of mysteries that challenge our current knowledge. In “Beyond Science” Epoch Times collects stories about these strange phenomena to stimulate the imagination and open up previously undreamed of possibilities. Are they true? You decide.

A mystery surrounds the curious excavation of a strange artifact and those who recovered it from the depths of an ancient tomb in China. When archaeologists reportedly recovered a modern-looking, mud-encrusted artifact from a 400-year-old sealed tomb in 2008, their astonishment was great. For some, this type of discovery could have only meant one thing—it was evidence of time travel. Was the discovery real? Was it a hoax? Could the find have been an intriguing artifact out-of-place and time?

Reports described the team as composed of archaeologists and journalists filming a documentary at a dig at a sealed tomb dating to the Ming Dynasty in Shangsi, southern China. As one of the coffins was being cleared of soil before being opened, a strange thing happened.

We picked up the object, and found it was a ring. After removing the covering soil and examining it further, we were shocked to see it was a watch.

“When we tried to remove the soil wrapped around the coffin, suddenly a piece of rock dropped off and hit the ground with metallic sound,” said Jiang Yanyu, a former curator of the Guangxi Autonomous Region Museum…

via Timeless Mystery: How Could a Swiss Ring-Watch End up in a Sealed Ming Dynasty Tomb?.

King Tut’s Tomb May Hold Nefertiti’s Lost Tomb – artnet News

Originally posted on artnet News.

The funerary mask of King Tutankhamun at the Cairo Museum, Egypt. Photo: Tim Graham, courtesy Getty Images.

Does the tomb of Tutankhamun hold a secret passageway to the burial chamber of Queen Nefertiti? One researcher believes he has found evidence of a sealed-off door that he believes led to the famously beautiful Egyptian ruler’s tomb.

Nicholas Reeves of the University of Arizona has published a paper, “The Burial of Nefertiti?” based on his belief that high-resolution scans of the tomb (taken to create a life-size copy of the space) show traces of two walled-over doorways beneath the painted walls. He speculates that the “ghost” doorways would have led to a storage chamber and to “the undisturbed…

via King Tut’s Tomb May Hold Nefertiti’s Lost Tomb – artnet News.

 

4500 years old tomb of unknown Ancient Egyptian Queen discovered

Khentkaus+III+5th+Dynasty+tomb+in+Abusir+by+Dr+Miroslav+Barta+by+Luxor+Times+1

The Minister of Antiquities announced today a new discovery of an Old Kingdom tomb in Abusir for a Queen who wasn’t known before called “Khentkaus III” during the excavations of the Czech Institute of Egyptology directed by Dr. Miroslav Barta.

The mission unearthed 23 limestone pots as well as 4 copper tools as a part of the funerary furniture for the tomb owner.

The side rooms of the discovered tomb have inscriptions mention titles of the tomb owner includes “Wife of the King” and “Mother of the King”

Dr. Miroslav Barta said “This discovery reveals an unknown part of the 5th Dynasty history which opens the door for more future studies on the family tree of this previously unknown Queen.”

Dr. Barta added “The unearthed tomb is a part of a small cemetery to the south east of the pyramid complex of King Neferefre (Raneferef) which led the team to think that Queen Khentkaus could be the wife of Neferefre hence she was….”

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3000 year old trousers discovered in Chinese grave oldest ever found

Re-blogged from Phys.org

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in the ancient Yanghai graveyard in China’s Tarim Basin has uncovered what appears to be the earliest example of trouser wearing. The research team has published a paper in the journal Quaternary International describing the pants and why they were likely developed to assist with riding horses.

The Tarim Basin in western China is host to the famous Yanghai tombs, a large ancient burial ground that dates back thousands of years—thus far over 500 individual gravesites have been excavated. In this latest find, two adult males (believed to be herders and warriors) both approximately 40 years old at the time of death, were wearing trousers. Carbon dating put the age of the material at approximately 3000 years ago, making the find the oldest known instance of trouser wearing.

In the tomb, along with the bodies, were a horse bit made of wood, a whip, a bow and a battle-axe. These artifacts along with the cut of the pants, suggest the trousers were created and worn to allow for easier horse riding over long periods of time. They also suggest that trouser creation had matured to a level that allowed for custom tailoring. Both specimens were created from three pieces of material (sized to fit a particular individual) one for each leg and a crotch piece—both also had an associated belt made of strings. No cutting was required. Each pant leg also had cross stitching that appeared to serve a purely decorative function…

Read more: 3000 year old trousers discovered in Chinese grave oldest ever found.