Meet the matchwomen who paved the way for the suffragettes | The Big Issue

matchwomenOne-hundred-and-thirty years ago this summer, trouble was brewing on the streets of the East End. Management bullying forced 1,400 mostly female matchworkers to walk out of Bryant & May’s factory in Bow. As they picketed the gates, battalions of police were rushed to the area.

This outrage against the status quo horrified polite society: a Victorian woman’s place was in the home, not…

via Meet the matchwomen who paved the way for the suffragettes | The Big Issue

Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Almost a hundred years ago, in February 1918, English women were granted the right to vote. To celebrate…

via Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Book Review: Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary by Anita Anand | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

The release of the film Suffragette late in 2015 brought the spotlight back on the efforts of several British women during the late 19th and early 20th centuries for women to have the same voting rights as men. Leaving aside the various shortcomings of the film, its biggest limitations were its inability to tackle all aspects of the movement or even subject it to in-depth analysis. For that, we will have to turn to other means such as books, articles, biographies, etc to obtain a more rounded picture of the struggles women faced in order to obtain the right to vote.

One of these is Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary by BBC journalist Anita Anand: an admirable attempt to bring to the forefront a life that has been pushed to the shadows and more or less forgotten. Princess Sophia Duleep Singh was born and lived in a time when the British Empire was at its height and lived to see it gradually dismantled. Her eventful life also saw her caught up with the winds of change that were to sweep Britain during the twentieth century and as the book’s title suggest, she would…

Source: Book Review: Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary by Anita Anand | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

vintage everyday: These Ridiculous Propaganda Postcards Warn Men about the Dangers of Women’s Rights from the Early 20th Century

These incredible vintage postcards are from 1900 to 1914, from the propaganda used against the women’s suffrage and the suffragettes, where change is presented as a direct attack against the values of the family and the place of man in society, sending husbands back at home to look after the children…

Source: vintage everyday: These Ridiculous Propaganda Postcards Warn Men about the Dangers of Women’s Rights from the Early 20th Century

Exhibition Review: Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom (Museum of London Docklands) | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

Originally posted on Enough of this Tomfoolery!.

In Inventing the Victorians, Matthew Sweet observed that the advent of technology allowed more women to go into work and not just in the traditional farming and cottage industry sectors but into the white-collar sector that was previously the domain of men. The invention of the telegraph, telephone, typewriter and adding machine provided employment opportunities for women to the point when certain jobs such as telephone operator, typist, secretary, bank teller and bookkeeper became female dominated and seen as “women’s work”. Owing to their nimble fingers and dexterity, women were seen as the ideal gender to operate and manipulate these pieces of machinery.

In the same way, technology also allowed women to pursue hobbies other than the usual sewing, drawing, painting, music and others that were deemed appropriate to their gender. Photography is one example and with the invention of the hand-held camera, many men and especially women took to taking photographs with enthusiasm. Queen Alexandra of Britain and the four daughters of Czar Nicholas II of Russia were examples of women who enthusiastically embraced the wonder of photography, becoming proficient with using a camera and it is through them that we have had…

via Exhibition Review: Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom (Museum of London Docklands) | Enough of this Tomfoolery!.