November 19, 1904 The Hunted – Today in History

We rarely hear about the work of the spy or the saboteur in times of war. These are the Heroes who work behind enemy lines, with little to protect them but their own guts and cleverness. We rarely know their names and yet, there are times when the lives of millions …

Source: November 19, 1904 The Hunted – Today in History

Want a real spy scandal? How about the aristocratic Conservative spy who was NEVER prosecuted? | Pride’s Purge

Heard the one about the Tory Old-Etonian Lord who despite being caught spying for the Japanese – giving them the know-how to take out Pearl Harbor and to capture Singapore resulting in 100,000 allied prisoners being taken, many of whom died in…

via Want a real spy scandal? How about the aristocratic Conservative spy who was NEVER prosecuted? | Pride’s Purge

The Welsh copper who became a Nazi double agent | historywithatwist

We have fanciful notions about spies – the men are dashing James Bond-types and the women are exotic, like Mata Hari. Alas, the reality can often be more prosaic. Take, for example, Gwilym Wi…

Source: The Welsh copper who became a Nazi double agent | historywithatwist

How a Gift from Schoolchildren Let the Soviets Spy on the U.S. for 7 Years | Atlas Obscura

In 1946, a group of Russian children from the Vladimir Lenin All-Union Pioneer Organisation (sort of a Soviet scouting group) presented a carved wooden replica of the Great Seal of the United States to Averell Harriman, the U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union.

The gift, a gesture of friendship to the USSR’s World War II ally, was hung in the…

Source: How a Gift from Schoolchildren Let the Soviets Spy on the U.S. for 7 Years | Atlas Obscura

Eric Roberts: The spy who suffered – BBC News

Originally posted on the BBC News.

One of the UK’s most brilliant wartime spies was poorly treated by colleagues at MI5 in the paranoid years of the Cold War and was left gripped by fear that he was suspected of being a traitor. Now an extraordinary letter and a series of family documents reveal the full story.

In the 1930s, Eric Roberts was a clerk with the Westminster Bank, where he seemed to be an average, unassuming employee.

But Roberts’s real work was espionage. He had been a field agent for MI5 since the 1920s, recruited by famous spymaster Maxwell Knight, and infiltrating first communist then fascist groups.

In 1940, when Churchill became concerned about the activities of potential fifth columnists, Roberts was taken on as a full time agent by MI5.

Working under the alias “Jack King”, Roberts posed as a Gestapo officer, part of the Einsatzgruppe London. For five years he worked with Nazi sympathisers in Britain, who thought they were part of…

via Eric Roberts: The spy who suffered – BBC News.