The Ninth Legion, Hadrian’s Wall and the Division of Britain | toritto

It is the year 120 A.D., the Romans are in southern Britain and Hadrian is Emperor in far away Rome.  The Romans first came to Britain with Julius Caesar, came back again during the reign of Claudius and now one hundred years later are fully encamped.

In 43AD the Ninth Legion is thought to have landed at Richborough with the rest of the Roman invasion force comprising the Second, Twentieth and Fourteenth Legions. The invasion force was under the command of Aulus Plautius who was the governor of Pannonia (western Hungary and eastern Austria) just prior to the Claudian invasion.

Seventeen years later the Ninth was mauled during the Boudicean uprising and was eventually posted to the most exposed northern outpost of Roman Britain, spending much…

Source: The Ninth Legion, Hadrian’s Wall and the Division of Britain | toritto

The Momentous Discovery of Agnes and Margaret Smith | Saints, Sisters, and Sluts

Originally posted  on Saints, Sisters, and Sluts

Saint Catherine’s Monastery, Sinai, Egypt by Berthold Werner (source)

In St. Catherine’s monastery at Mount Sinai, there is a special decorated box with an outer wooden cover and an inner glass cover. Inside the box, carefully wrapped in silk is a manuscript which is the oldest extant copy of the four canonical gospels in Syriac. This manuscript was first discovered and photographed by Agnes Smith Lewis and Margaret Dunlop Gibson, two middle-aged ladies who undertook the journey by camel to the monastery in the late 19th century.

This wasn’t the first journey they had taken. Agnes and Margaret Smith, identical twins, were raised by their father who had a love of travel. Their mother died soon after their birth on  January 11,1843, and he decided to raise them on his own. This included educating them “as though they were boys.” At some point he discovered that the girls had a talent for languages and told them that when they learned a language, he would take them to the country where it was spoken. With this incentive, they learned French, Spanish, German, and Italian and were rewarded with wonderful travels.

Irvin in the early 19th century, about 30 miles southwest of Glasgow where the sisters grew up (source)

John Smith was a self-made man, a solicitor with a client base that gave him a respectable income. All of this changed when one of his clients, John Ferguson, died leaving what was at the time, the largest estate to be settled in the courts of Scotland. Ferguson was the recipient of the fortunes of four unmarried uncles who died intestate. He was also a distant relative of John Smith. This event made two great changes of the lives of the sisters. First, on the death of their father, they would become very wealthy, and second their father had to go to America to settle much of the estate. The girls were put into a boarding school, Birkenhead, near Liverpool, having to leave…

via The Momentous Discovery of Agnes and Margaret Smith | Saints, Sisters, and Sluts.