When Christmas was cancelled: what 1647’s riots and rebellion can teach us today

Back in 1647, Christmas was banned in the kingdoms of England (which at the time included Wales), Scotland and Ireland and it didn’t work out very well. Following a total ban on everything festive, from decorations to gatherings, rebellions broke out across the country. While some activity took the form of hanging holly in defiance, other action was …

Source: When Christmas was cancelled: what 1647’s riots and rebellion can teach us today

Food Riots and Recession in Napoleonic-era England | Pen and Pension

Declaration by Norfolk Labourers Photo Nigel Jones CC

In 1793, the tensions caused by the revolution in France finally exploded into a pan-european conflict. In some ways, it was nothing new. Wars were endemic to most parts of the European continent. …

Source: Food Riots and Recession in Napoleonic-era England | Pen and Pension

The Victorian Demagogue: 19th Century Words on a Modern Day Danger – Mimi Matthews

John Bright, Vanity Fair, 1869.

John Bright, Vanity Fair, 1869.

“No organist can manipulate the stops and keys of his instrument with more dexterity than the demagogue exhibits in playing upon the different weaknesses, errors, and absurdities of the untutored m…

Source: The Victorian Demagogue: 19th Century Words on a Modern Day Danger – Mimi Matthews

Who shot Edward Vyse in the head? The Corn Law Riots, 1815 – About1816

In 1815 the soldiers and sailors won the war against Napoleon but the government handed the victory to the landlords. They had profited from the high price of   grain during the war blockade, and s…

Source: Who shot Edward Vyse in the head? The Corn Law Riots, 1815 – About1816

‘The Night of the Broken Glass’ | i-history

Originally posted on  i-history in 2014.

‘The Night of the Broken Glass’

On this day in 1938, a great evil spread across Germany and Austria. The German Nazi party launched a cancerous campaign of terror against the Jewish people, destroying homes and decimating businesses. This event, later dubbed ‘Kristallnacht’, bore witness to unfathomable acts of cruelty.

‘The Night of Broken Glass’ left approximately 100 Jews dead, 7,500 Jewish business damaged and countless schools, homes, synagogues and graveyards devastated. An estimated 30,000 Jewish men were arrested, many of whom were sent to concentration camps, only to be released on the promise of leaving Germany. The two day terror represented a histrionic intensification of the campaign generated by Adolf Hitler to purge Germany of its Jewish population. Today, one year after the 75th anniversary, we continue to reflect on the importance of…

via ‘The Night of the Broken Glass’ | i-history.