The History of the Mailrail | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

Deep under the streets of London and its snarl of urban traffic is a virtually unknown railway that for 75 years was an artery in Britain’s postal network. Seventy feet below ground, the Post Offic…

Source: The History of the Mailrail | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

Part of the A212 road runs along one side of Crystal Palace Park, carrying traffic between the suburbs of south-east London.  However, beneath a section of the road – unbeknownst to those pas…

Source: A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

A Doric Tragedy: Demolishing the Euston Arch | cabinetroom

Drivers crawling along the Euston Road in the north of Central London will be familiar with the uninspiring, bland and brutal space that surrounds Euston Station. The three high-rise office blocks in particular seem to have been lifted from some mediocre midwestern city in the United States (Minneapolis? Cleveland?) and plonked down in Britain’s capital, as if outposts of a regional insurance firm or bank. Train passengers too will know the unpleasant warren of passageways and concrete steps that cluster around these blocks, leading from the station onto a dirty apron of grass, which itself appears custom-made for discarded free-sheets, beer cans and syringes.

The current Euston Station was opened by the Queen in 1968, but, like so many modern buildings, it has never really lived up to the artist’s impression.

It was not always thus. Until 1961, Euston Station was separated from the Euston Road by several smaller streets and the…

Source: A Doric Tragedy: Demolishing the Euston Arch | cabinetroom.

A Brief History Of Bishopsgate Goodsyard | Spitalfields Life

Originally posted on Spitalfields Life.

There are many continuities that run through time in Spitalfields, yet the most disturbing is the history of brutal change which has been wreaked upon the neighbourhood over centuries.

The Hospital of the Priory of St Mary – from which the name Spitalfields is derived – was established in the eleventh century as a refuge for the homeless, conveniently one mile north from the City of London which sought to expel vagabond and beggars. Then Henry VIII destroyed this Priory in the sixteenth century and seized the ‘Spital fields which he turned over to usage as his Artillery Ground.

In the eighteen-thirties, the Eastern Counties Railway, cut across the north of Spitalfields to construct Bishopsgate Station on Shoreditch High St, pushing families from their homes to seek new accommodation in the surrounding streets. The overcrowded area to the north became known as the Nichol, notorious for…

via A Brief History Of Bishopsgate Goodsyard | Spitalfields Life.

Suez Canal: It Will Never Work

texthistory

The disaster of the Indian mutiny in 1857 and the delays in getting news of it made people consider ways of improving contact between Europe and Asia. But when a ship canal in Suez was suggested, Lord Palmerston responded:

“For the last 15 years Her Majesty’ Government have used all the influence they possess at Constantinople and in Egypt to prevent that scheme from being carried into execution. It is an undertaking which, I believe, in point of commercial character, may be deemed to rank among the many bubble schemes that from time to time have been palmed upon gullible capitalists. I have been informed, on what I believe to be reliable authority, that it is physically impracticable, except at an expense which would be far too great to warrant any expectation of any returns. ”

It was not that he minded investors getting heir fingers burned if they ignored…

View original post 60 more words