These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them

Portrait of Ethel Smyth, 1901, John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Ethel Smyth (1858 – 1944), 1901, John Singer Sargent

Role-models matter as much as they ever did but women are also significantly under-represented in our history books. Their absence has taken its toll: a 2016 survey carried out by English Heritage revealed that 40 percent of us believe men have had a greater impact on history than women. It’s a misconception, of course. Women have always excelled, we just haven’t easily been able to read their stories because the omission has…

via These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them – The i – Weekend Reads #30

The History Girls: Your Last Paper Five Pound Note by Janie Hampton

For the past fifteen years, all of us who live in Britain have looked at this woman many thousands of times. But within the next few months, she will disappear from public view as paper notes are replaced with plastic ones. Who is she?

Source: The History Girls: Your Last Paper Five Pound Note by Janie Hampton

War objectors’ graffiti must be saved, says English Heritage

Fragile walls at Richmond Castle bear rare first-hand testimonial from men who refused to serve in first world war…

Source: War objectors’ graffiti must be saved, says English Heritage

A Felon for President – Eugene V. Debs | toritto

Eugene V. Debs was born in Terre Haute, Indiana in 1855 to prosperous immigrant parents from Alsace, France.  He attended public schools, dropping out at 14 to take a job on the Vandalia Railroad c…

Source: A Felon for President – Eugene V. Debs | toritto

Josef Jakobs – the Last Execution At The Tower Of London.

Crime Scribe

 Josef Jakobs, the last person executed at the Tower of London.
Josef Jakobs, the last person executed at the Tower of London.

The Tower of London, nowadys a popular tourist destination. Once also a prison, defensive fortress, a crime scene (if you believe, as I do, that the ‘Princes in the Tower’ were murdered here) and also the site of a number of execution. Anne Boleyn, Lady Jane Grey (who was the shortest-reigning Queen in British history, in office for only nine days), and of host of others. And it’s one of those others that we’re looking at today.

If you’re thinking, as so many do, that the Tower’s reputation for executions ended in medieval times then you’d be wrong. 11 German spies were shot there in the First World War and one in the Second. He was Josef Jakobs from Luxembourg, executed by firing squad on August 15, 1941, who holds the grim distinction of being the last prisoner executed…

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John Brown and his John Thomas: a perversion stopped by the Vagrancy Act

Criminal Historian

800px-Tramp_smoking_cigar_with_cane_over_arm_-_restorationJohn Brown had a bit of a predilection. The white-haired Londoner, who was around 70 years old, had a disconcerting habit of exposing himself in public places.

John Brown would get his John Thomas out at every opportunity, in any public place in the vicinity of Whitefriars.

Whitefriars, between Fleet Street and the river Thames, had once been a salubrious place, but was now acquiring a reputation as “a debtors’ sanctuary and thieves’ paradise”, a dingy area where people fought and cheated their way through life.

It was in this darkening part of London that John Brown operated, targeting not not only women, but children, horrifying them. It was in this small, grim network of alleys and wharves that Brown had been able to carry on with his anti-social, sexual behaviour for a considerable amount of time.

But in 1824, a new vagrancy act was passed, that suddenly curtailed Brown’s activities.

The interior of the Guildhall, 1820 The interior of the Guildhall, 1820

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