The Fortsas Bibliohoax, or how a Belgian collector fooled book lovers for the fun of it

Hoaxes, fakes, and other schemes are no strangers in the rare books world. Literary hoaxes may not always be easy to spot, but their motivations – money, prestige, revenge, and other personal gain – are typically straightforward. On rare occasions, however, a scheme appears seemingly for no reason other than its creator’s own entertainment.

The Fortsas Bibliohoax […] is an unusually clever example of such a game.

In the summer of 1840, many wealthy…

Source: The Fortsas Bibliohoax, or how a Belgian collector fooled book lovers for the fun of it

A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Lighter Side Of The Peninsular Campaign

Originally posted on A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life.

In this year of the Waterloo bicentenary, there are so many illuminating posts on various historical sites, detailing the events and describing the countless other military engagements that have led to the ultimate Allied victory against Napoleonic France.

I have taken the liberty to address a lighter side of the gruesome conflict that had gripped Europe for such a length of time. In doing so, I am perhaps reinforcing the stereotype. It is often said of Regency aficionados that they view the era through rose-tinted glasses. That they choose to focus on the glamour, the balls, the manners, the high-society people in elegant apparel – whilst ignoring the dark realities of the time, such as the plight of the dispossessed, the lengthy wars that have crippled the country or the plain fact that even the muslin-clad ladies whose carefree lifestyle they admire were not immune to the tragedies of death in childbirth or the ravaging effects of...

via A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life: A Lighter Side Of The Peninsular Campaign.