August 10, 1920, Ottoman Empire – Today in History

Throughout the period, the “secret sauce” of Ottoman power was an army of élite infantry called “Janissaries”.  Janissaries were Christian slaves, usually taken as spoils of…

Source: August 10, 1920, Ottoman Empire – Today in History

On this day: a king for Albania | In Times Gone By…

Otto Witte – a German circus performer – claimed he was crowned King of Albania on the 13th of August, 1913. When Albania broke free of the Ottoman Empire and Serbian occupation, a Musl…

Source: On this day: a king for Albania | In Times Gone By…

A Yorkshireman in Istanbul, 1593 | History Today

Soon after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, a young Yorkshireman named Edward Barton was despatched to the Sultan’s court to promote the interests of the Levant Company.

The capture of Constantinople in 1453 by the Ottoman Turks signalled the collapse of Byzantine power and, because the Turks knew little of international trade and commerce, it might have led to an administrative vacuum. But the Sultan, Mohammed, wisely decided to adopt many of the customs and institutions developed by the Byzantines during the 1,000 years of their Empire. Among these was the system of capitulations – a word derived from the Latin capitulae, meaning the chapters of an agreement or treaty governing the relations between the State and other nations and their citizens in Constantinople. The status and rights of non-Turks in the Ottoman Empire thus came to be defined by…

Source: A Yorkshireman in Istanbul, 1593 | History Today.

On this day: the Siege of Vienna

In Times Gone By...

The Ottoman Turks began their Siege of Vienna on the 27th of September 1529. Suleiman the Magnificent led the Ottoman Empire’s first attempt to take Vienna.

The siege ran until the 15th of October, when the Christian Coalition defeated the Ottomans.

Austrian troops clash with Turks outside Vienna.

Engraving of clashes between the Austrians and Ottomans outside Vienna, 1529.

View original post

27 of August 1922 Greco-Turkish War #onthisday

20 of July 1402 A.D Ottoman- Timurid wars #Onthisday

1402 today the : Ottoman-Timurid wars : Battle of Ankara, Timur the ruler of Timurid Empire defeats the Ottoman empire sultan Bayezid I

29 of June 1807 Battle of Athos #Onthisday

On this day: the Ottoman Siege of Rhodes Began

In Times Gone By...

On the 26th of June 1522 the Ottomans (Turks) began the Siege of Rhodes and eventually conquered the Greek island, securing the eastern Mediterranean after more than one attempt.

5On the 26th of June 1522 the Ottomans (Turks) began the Siege of Rhodes and eventually conquered, securing the eastern Mediterranean, after more than one attempt.

View original post

The Bulgarian martyresses

In Times Gone By...

The Bulgarian martyresses by Konstantin Makovsky, a painting depicting the rape of Bulgarian women by Ottoman troops during the April Uprising of 1876.

The Bulgarian martyresses by Konstantin Makovsky , a painting depicting the rape of Bulgarian women by Ottoman troops during the April Uprising of 1876.

View original post

Blonde cargoes: Finnish children in the slave markets of medieval Crimea

You think you know your history and then you come across this article from Blast from the Past about a slave trade involving the Crimea.

A Blast From The Past

Testing a female captive's teeth in an eastern slave market. Testing a female captive’s teeth in an eastern slave market.

The horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade have left an ineradicable mark on history. In the course of a little more than three and a half centuries, 12.5 million prisoners – at least two-thirds of them men destined for a life of labour in the fields – were shipped from holding pens along the African coast to destinations ranging from Argentina in the south all the way north to Canada. It was the largest forced migration in modern history.

When we think of slavery, we tend to think of this African traffic. Yet it was not the only such trade – nor was it, before 1700, even the largest. A second great market in slaves once sullied the world, this one less well-known, vastly longer-lasting, and centred on the Black Sea ports of the Crimea. It was a huge trade in its own right; in its great years, which lasted roughly from…

View original post 4,388 more words

WWI: The Smuts-Gandhi Agreement

Edinburgh Eye

On Tuesday 30th June 1914 the House of Commons had a routine sitting.

The Conservative MP for Knutsford, Alan Sykes, who had been commissioned a Deputy-Lieutenant to the Lord Lieutenant for Cheshire in 1910, rose to ask a question of the Under-Secretary of State for War about the Infantry Territorial battalions of Lancashire and Cheshire:

What percentage of the total enrolled number of officers and men of the Infantry Territorial battalions of Lancashire and Cheshire attended their annual camp this year in the Whitsuntide holidays, indicating what percentage attended for one week and what for the whole period, and giving comparative figures for the same battalions of their attendance at last year’s annual camp?

Harold Tennant, the Liberal Under-secretary of State for War, answered the Opposition question with specific percentages for 1914 and 1913, and said, when Sykes asked if the bounty of a pound had improved…

View original post 2,616 more words