A Hero Overlooked by History – British Resistance in the Occupied Channel Islands in World War Two

German military band marching past Lloyds Bank on The Pollet, St Peter Port at Guernsey. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source

British policemen, ‘bobbies,’ on Britain’s Channel Islands during the Second World War could certainly identify with Sam Riley, a Scotland Yard detective…

Source: A Hero Overlooked by History – British Resistance in the Occupied Channel Islands in World War Two

The History Girls: Women of the Warsaw Uprising, by Clare Mulley

Gravestone of a female resistance fighter,
Powąnski Cemetery, Warsaw.
(Copyright Clare Mulley)

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the end of the Warsaw Uprising. By the summer of 1944 the tide of the Second World War had turned. The Soviets, now Allies, had reversed the German advance, and France was fighting towards liberation. Sensing change, the Polish government-in-exile authorized their highly organised resistance ‘Home Army’ to rise up against the extremely brutal Nazi forces occupying their capital.

On the 1st August thousands of Polish men, women and children launched a coordinated attack. The Poles had faced invasion on two fronts at the start of the war, and were well aware of the dual threat to their independence. Their aim now was to liberate Warsaw from the Nazis so that they could welcome the advancing Soviet Army as free, or at least fighting, citizens. Moscow radio had appealed to the Poles to take action, but the Red Army then deliberately waited within hearing distance for the ensuing conflict to decimate the Polish resistance before making their own entry. The Warsaw Uprising is remembered as one of the most courageous resistance actions of the Second World War, but also…

Continue: The History Girls: Women of the Warsaw Uprising, by Clare Mulley.

Palestine Conflict: Gandhi 1938

01/00/1998. File pictures of Mahatma Gandhi

“Palestine belongs to the Arabs in the same sense that England belongs to the English or France to the French…What is going on in Palestine today cannot be justified by any moral code of conduct…If they [the Jews] must look to the Palestine of geography as their national home, it is wrong to enter it under the shadow of the British gun. A religious act cannot be performed with the aid of the bayonet or the bomb. They can settle in Palestine only by the goodwill of the Arabs… As it is, they are co-sharers with the British in despoiling a people who have done no wrong to them. I am not defending the Arab excesses. I wish they had chosen the way of non-violence in resisting what they rightly regard as an unacceptable encroachment upon their country. But according to the accepted canons of right and wrong, nothing can be said against the Arab resistance in the face of overwhelming odds.”

Mahatma Gandhi 1938

Then what?

So you say the land is yours.
Then what?
So you put hundreds of thousands to flight.
Then what?
So you take over land.
Then what?
So you round up thousands.
Then what?
So you build a wall.
Then what?
So you bulldoze homes.
Then what?
So you drop bombs.
Then what?
So you invade.
Then what?
So you kill children.
Then what?
So you shell hospitals.
Then what?
So you say you won’t talk to terrorists.
Then what?
So you say the land is yours.
Then what?
 by Michael Rosen

Related

Old English Occupation: Knocker-Up Keeping Employees Working

Although this article I have re-blogged here talks about knocker-uppers lasting until the 1920s, they actually continued, as Pete Johnson comments below, into the 1950s, possibly beyond.

Originally posted on Genealogy Research Network

Many old and honorable occupations that no longer exist have their origins deeply rooted in history when people worked many varying trades.  Some of these professions are not what historians or genealogists might consider to be mainstream work, but over the years these various lines of work have provided great stories that can be passed down to future generations.

One of these jobs was that of the knocker-up also sometimes referred to as a knocker-upper.  This profession was prevalent in both England and Ireland having started during the early days of the Industrial Revolution and lasted into the beginnings of the 20th Century as late as the 1920s.  Before alarm clocks were both affordable, and reliable, it was the job…

via Old English Occupation: Knocker-Up Keeping Employees Working | Genealogy Research Network.