The Green Fields of France

Two versions of one of the most moving songs about The Great War — The Green Fields of France (also known as No Man’s Land), written by Scottish-born folk singer-songwriter Eric Bogle in 1976.
greenfieldsoffrance

The Green Fields of France performed by The Fureys and Davey Arthur.

The Green Fields of France performed by Eric Bogle

Siegfried Sassoon, Hopelessness and Iraq

Critical Dispatches

Sassoon

Snooping around the charity shops of West London a week past, I spied a copy of Siegfried Sassoon’s fictionalized autobiography, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer, on sale for £1. The discovery of a such a volume came as a revelation as although I had been aware of and enjoyed Sassoon’s poetic work (along with Wilfred Owen, he is my hero as far as political poetry is concerned) since I was a preteen– as I am sure anyone born in the North West of England is bred into – I had no idea that he also published prose. At a quid, I would have been the worst sort of miser not to pick it up.

The scale of the whole thing – the de-humaning conditions, the destruction of human life, the sheer hopelessness of it all – is nothing less than horrifying. I remember reading in Savage Continent, Keith Lowe’s brilliant…

View original post 614 more words