Military morality: the problem of scruples. – SeanMunger.com

One of the blogs I read, day in and day out, is Padre Steve’s. Steve is a military chaplain with 30+ years experience who has served in Iraq and knows the real face of war inside and out. He is also a historian who has studied and written extensively on Germany in the Weimar and Nazi periods, especially about its military establishment. Very often–in fact, in almost every article–Padre Steve sounds a clear historical warning that the United States is going down exactly the same road of totalitarianism that Germany experienced in the 1920s and 1930s. Steve appears to be a voice in the wilderness, sounding…

via Military morality: the problem of scruples. – SeanMunger.com

Penny Dreadfuls, Juvenile Crime, and Late-Victorian Moral Panic

dick-turpin-penny-dreadful-1866-1868

Black Bess or The Knight of the Road, featuring Dick Turpin, 1866-1868.

The 1840s ushered in an era of luridly illustrated gothic tales which were marketed to a working-class Victorian audience.  These stories, told in installments and printed on inexpensive pulp paper, were originally only eight pages long and sold for just a penny – giving rise to the term “penny bloods” or “penny dreadfuls.”  With titles such as Varney the Vampire and Sweeney Todd: the Demon Barber of Fleet Street, these types of publications were wildly popular, especially with young male readers, and it was not long before the Victorian public began to make a connection between various juvenile crimes and misdemeanors and the consumption of this (allegedly) depraved material.

By the 1880s, concern over penny dreadfuls leading children into lives of crime and vice sparked what theLongman Companion to Victorian Fiction describes as a “middle-class moral panic.”  Many urged that the publication and consumption of penny dreadfuls be…

Source: Penny Dreadfuls, Juvenile Crime, and Late-Victorian Moral Panic