Maxwell Knight – MI5’s Greatest Spymaster – on Female Spies

“It is frequently alleged that women are less discreet than men, that they are ruled by their emotions, and not by their brains: that they rely on intuition rather than on reason; and that Sex will play an unsettling and dangerous role in their work. …  it is curious that in the history of espionage and counter-espionage a very high percentage of the greatest coups have been brought off by women … this – if it proves anything – proves that the spymasters of the world are inclined to lay down hard and fast rules, which they subsequently find it impossible to keep to, and it is in their interests to break.”

I’m halfway through the book and it’s a riveting read. Sarah

Source: Maxwell Knight, MI5’s Greatest Spymaster BY Henry Hemmings

How a dozen silk stockings helped bring down Adolf Hitler | The Independent

'Mrs Garbo', Araceli Gonzalez de Pujol, complained of 'too much macaroni, too many potatoes [and] not enough fish'. The National Archives

‘Mrs Garbo’, Araceli Gonzalez de Pujol, complained of ‘too much macaroni, too many potatoes [and] not enough fish’. The National Archives

Possibly the greatest double cross operation in British espionage history was nearly ruined by a Spanish double agent’s homesick wife and her horror at wartime British food, newly declassified documents have revealed.

Source: How a dozen silk stockings helped bring down Adolf Hitler | The Independent

File release: Cold War Cambridge spies Burgess and Maclean – The National Archives

Today we are releasing over 400 files from the Security Service (MI5), Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Cabinet Office which focus on Cold War investigations that revealed Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean to be part of the Cambridge Spy Ring, one of the most famous spy cases in history. The collection also includes other intelligence […]

Source: File release: Cold War Cambridge spies Burgess and Maclean – The National Archives

Eric Roberts: The spy who suffered – BBC News

Originally posted on the BBC News.

One of the UK’s most brilliant wartime spies was poorly treated by colleagues at MI5 in the paranoid years of the Cold War and was left gripped by fear that he was suspected of being a traitor. Now an extraordinary letter and a series of family documents reveal the full story.

In the 1930s, Eric Roberts was a clerk with the Westminster Bank, where he seemed to be an average, unassuming employee.

But Roberts’s real work was espionage. He had been a field agent for MI5 since the 1920s, recruited by famous spymaster Maxwell Knight, and infiltrating first communist then fascist groups.

In 1940, when Churchill became concerned about the activities of potential fifth columnists, Roberts was taken on as a full time agent by MI5.

Working under the alias “Jack King”, Roberts posed as a Gestapo officer, part of the Einsatzgruppe London. For five years he worked with Nazi sympathisers in Britain, who thought they were part of…

via Eric Roberts: The spy who suffered – BBC News.