10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

fanny-burney-plaqueMuch has been made about the dearth of women featured on blue plaques in this 150th year [2016] of the scheme – according to English Heritage, only 13 per cent of the 900 odd blue plaques in London …

Source: 10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

What’s in a name?…Savile Row | Exploring London

savile-rowFamous around the world as the home of bespoke tailoring in London, Savile Row owes its name – like so many other streets in Mayfair – to landowner Richard Boyle, the 3rd Earl of Burlington.

Burlington (1612-98) resided at Burlington House (now home of the Royal Academy of Arts) on Piccadilly and after his death the land around his former home was developed and the streets named for Burlington and members of his family.

Among them was his wife, Lady Burlington, née Lady Dorothy Savile, after whom Savile Row was named. Laid out in 1695, the street was actually located on the site of the former kitchen gardens of Burlington House and was given its name (originally Savile Street) in…

Source: What’s in a name?…Savile Row | Exploring London

White Horse Street, hill figures, and a dragon

thestreetnames

John Rocque, one of London’s most famous cartographers, had a print shop near White Horse Street in Mayfair. The street takes its name from a royal emblem used in tavern signs; this was from the royal house of Hanover, which adopted a galloping white horse, dating from the accession of George I in 1714. The sign itself, however, was in use long before that as the emblem of ancient Saxons and, later, the emblem of Kent.

There are several chalk figures – mainly horses – in the UK, carved into hillsides; although they are not uncommon, only a handful have been dated before 1700. One of the oldest (possibly the oldest) and most famous is in the Vale of the White Horse at Uffington in Oxfordshire.

The age of this horse is uncertain: it was once said to commemorate the victory of King Alfred over the Danes in 871, but…

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