The Day the Nazis Bombed Dublin | historywithatwist

Noel Brady was standing with his father at the hall  door of their family home on St Ignatius Road in Dublin’s North Strand area when they heard the drone of a Nazi Luftwaffe bomber flying overhead…

Source: The Day the Nazis Bombed Dublin | historywithatwist

Shot down over Germany – Ed Dostie of Englewood survived 690 days, mostly in Stalag-17 | War Tales

The crew of “Sky Wolf,” a B-17 bomber shot down over Germany on July 13, 1943, is pictured in front of their ill-fated “Flying Fortress” shortly after arriving in England. Thy were part of the American 8th Air Force that pulverized the Reich in daily raids over Nazi-occupied Europe. Photo provided

He was on his fourth mission over Germany in a B-17 bomber called “Sky Wolf” when his luck ran out. It was June 13, 1943, their target: the submarine pens at Wilhelmshaven, a major Nort…

Source: Shot down over Germany – Ed Dostie of Englewood survived 690 days, mostly in Stalag-17 | War Tales

Do Bunny Down: when shared war stories can help to heal, by Clare Mulley

The crew of the Do Bunny, Charles ‘Chuck’ Blaney is standing, back right. (Courtesy of Chuck Blaney)

When researching biographies I am privileged to meet and exchange letters with many people whose observations, perspectives and actions present new insights into the past, and sometimes into the present. My current work, on two remarkable female pilots from the Second World War, has led to interviews with veterans and other witnesses from several sides of that terrible conflict. As always, many tales have emerged that have no bearing on the story I am telling – but which I cannot bear to let go unrecorded. This is the story of some USAAF servicemen who crashed into an enemy field, and the young German boy who was desperate to find them…

Source: Do Bunny Down: when shared war stories can help to heal, by Clare Mulley

The Bethnal Green Tube Disaster | The East End

Bethnal Green Tube Disaster Memorial Plaque

Bethnal Green Tube Disaster Memorial Plaque

The residents of Bethnal Green in the East End of London had become used to the ‘crump, crump, crump’ of the bombs being dropped on the capital by the Luftwaffe. The Blitz had been almost continuous during the winter of 1940 / 41 – indeed the city had once been hit for 57 consecutive nights, but now, as winter began to give way to spring in March 1943, things seemed to be a bit quieter. However, the population was on its guard, as the RAF had bombed Berlin a couple of nights before, and it was well known that Germany often responded with reprisal bombings soon afterwards…

The East End of London had been a target for German Bombing campaigns for a long time, in an attempt to disrupt the flow of materials and goods through the crucially important London Docks. As a result, people were becoming familiar with the air raid sirens and bombing raids that seemed to form a constant part of their everyday lives.

Many families had built Anderson or Morrison Shelters in their own back gardens, but these prefabricated huts were often…

Source: The Bethnal Green Tube Disaster | The East End

The London Blitz, 1940

Originally posted on Eyewitness to History.

blitz1The appearance of German bombers in the skies over London during the afternoon of September 7, 1940 heralded a tactical shift in Hitler’s attempt to subdue Great Britain. During the previous two months, the Luftwaffe had targeted RAF airfields and radar stations for destruction in preparation for the German invasion of the island. With invasion plans put on hold and eventually scrapped, Hitler turned his attention to destroying London in an attempt to demoralize the population and force the British to come to terms. At around 4:00 PM on that September day, 348 German bombers escorted by 617 fighters Sept. 7, 1940 – the beginning of theLondon Blitz blasted London until 6:00 PM. Two hours later, guided by the fires set by the first assault, a second group of raiders commenced another attack that lasted until 4:30 the following morning.

This was the beginning of the Blitz – a period of intense bombing of London and other cities that continued until the following May. For the next consecutive 57 days, London was bombed either during the day or night. Fires consumed many portions of the city. Residents sought shelter wherever they could find it – many fleeing to the Underground stations that sheltered as many as 177,000 people during the night. In the worst single incident, 450 were killed when…

Source: The London Blitz, 1940