Churchill statue ‘may have to be put in museum’, says granddaughter – BBC News

A statue of Winston Churchill may have to be put in a museum to protect it if demonstrations continue, his granddaughter has said.

Emma Soames told the BBC the war-time prime minister was a “complex man” but he was considered a hero by millions..

She said she was “shocked” to see the monument in London’s Parliament Square boarded up, although she said she understood why this…

Source: Churchill statue ‘may have to be put in museum’, says granddaughter – BBC News

Lessons from a forgotten murder

Fifty years ago, in early April 1970, there was a horrific racist murder in the East End, but the memory of this tragic case has been obscured by later similar events in that locality…

Source: Lessons from a forgotten murder

Reblog – The Guardians Of London’s Lost Rivers

Screenshot 2020-01-31 at 6.32.33 pm

London is situated upon a river basin and owes its origin to the Thames. Yet once upon a time many other rivers flowed through the city which have been ‘lost,’ mostly absorbed into the modern drainage network or occasionally diverted into decorative water features such as the Serpentine in Hyde Park…

Source:  Spitalfields Life

JULY 28, 1948: THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN WITH NO FLYING MACHINES – Wretched Richard’s Almanac

bobbiesA fog had settled over London on July 28, 1948.  All was quiet and seemingly normal. But of course it wasn’t. Visualize if you will a large shipment of gold bullion awaiting transport at London Airport. A gang of evildoers determined to make off with it.  And an elite throng of intrepid crimestoppers known as the Metropolitan Police Flying Squad. You have all the ingredients in place for the adventure known as

via JULY 28, 1948: THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN WITH NO FLYING MACHINES – Wretched Richard’s Almanac

Henry Mayhew, The London Vagabond | Spitalfields Life

Henrymayhew

When Henry Mayhew died in 1887, one newspaper noted ‘The chief impression created in the public mind was one of surprise that he should still be alive.’ Yet nearly forty years earlier, his London Labour & the London Poor had gripped the country, confronting it with the voices…

via Henry Mayhew, The London Vagabond | Spitalfields Life

January 29, 1944 Operation Pied Piper – Today in History

94330In the summer of 1938, the horrors of the Great War were a mere twenty years in the past.  Hitler had swallowed up Austria, only six months earlier.   Authorities divided the British Isles into “risk zones”, identified as “evacuation,” “neutral,” and “reception.”  In some of the most gut wrenching decisions of the age, these people were planning “Operation Pied Piper”, the evacuation of…

via January 29, 1944 Operation Pied Piper – Today in History

High Buildings, Low Morals by Rob Baker | The Great Wen

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I wrote about Rob Baker’s last book – Beautiful Idiots, Brilliant Lunatics – a couple of years ago. It’s a collection of London-based short histories inspired by Rob’s superb blog, Another Nickel In The Machine. Rob’s now written a follow-up, High Buildings, Low Morals, which again explores a dozen London stories from the 20th century, some entirely forgotten and others…

via High Buildings, Low Morals by Rob Baker | The Great Wen

The Milkman | Iconic Photos

Keep Calm and Carry On, proclaimed the poster which is now overused and over-parodied. Ironically, the poster was never used — the campaign was abandoned just as the Second World War began. In…

Source: The Milkman | Iconic Photos

The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog

A guest post by LH Member Suzie Grogan. This article first appeared in London Historians Members’ Newsletter from November 2013. Before 1914, the idea that war could be waged in the air was b…

Source: The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog

Poverty in early Edwardian London | In Times Gone By…

Adelaide Springett was ashamed of her tattered boots and so took them off for her photograph, taken in 1901. The children who were photographed at the end of the Victorian and in the Edwardian eras…

Source: Poverty in early Edwardian London | In Times Gone By…

A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

Part of the A212 road runs along one side of Crystal Palace Park, carrying traffic between the suburbs of south-east London.  However, beneath a section of the road – unbeknownst to those pas…

Source: A Victorian marvel beneath the streets: Crystal Palace subway – Flickering Lamps

Gibraltar Evacuees in London | London Historians’ Blog

A guest post by Joe Gingell.

In May 1940 the British Government ordered the evacuation of women, children, the elderly and infirm to French Morocco to convert Gibraltar into a fully-fledged fortress…

Source: Gibraltar Evacuees in London | London Historians’ Blog

V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

Re-blog from 8 May 2015

Benedicta Leigh 1922—2000 [photo: David Sim]

My mother, Benedicta Leigh, was in her late teens when the Second World War broke out. She signed up to be a VAD [Voluntary Aid Detachment] nurse and was working at a hospital in London when German…

Source: V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Metropolitan Police Coat Hook – London, England – Atlas Obscura

Well, I never knew that but I bet you did, Pete!

To become a London cabbie requires more than guidebooks and a smart phone. There is a test—some say the world’s toughest test—known as The Knowledge. In order to pass, a driver needs to navigate the city’s 25,000 streets without a map or help from GPS, and identify every possible tourist spot, no matter how obscure. Case in point: Great Newport Street’s Metropolitan Police coat hook…

Source: Metropolitan Police Coat Hook – London, England – Atlas Obscura

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

1st April in Victorian London | In Times Gone By…

An invitation to the fake “Washing the Lions” event at the Tower of London – an April Fools’ Day joke from the 1850s.

Source: 1st April in Victorian London | In Times Gone By…