Hanging a Monkey as a French Spy During the Napoleonic Wars | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

What do you know of the Hartlepool Monkey and the “Monkey Hangers”? I certainly knew nothing of the tale until I stumbled across it. Legend says that a shipwrecked monkey was hanged as …

Source: Hanging a Monkey as a French Spy During the Napoleonic Wars | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Drowned Churches and Ghostly Peals: Britain’s Lost Bells | The Witch, The Weird, and The Wonderful

Originally posted on The Witch, The Weird, and The Wonderful.

bells2

Tales of bells that have been lost to the sea are a familiar occurrence in many legends, especially those that take place around Britain’s coastline. Whether lost by bad weather, bad luck, or punishment for a rash word spoken in anger, here are a selection of Britain’s drowned bells.

The Legend of Kilgrimol:

This tale is located at Lytham St Anne’s near Blackpool in Lancashire. Not far from the shore it is said that a church and its churchyard lie submerged beneath the waves. Known as Kilgrimol, there have been several explanations for what happened to the ill-fated church. Walter Thornber in his History of Blackpool and it’s Neighbourhood states that an earthquake caused the disaster, whereas other sources report a violent storm as the cause of the disappearance.

This story is founded on a degree of fact, and according to a 17th century source there was indeed…

Source: The Witch, The Weird, and The Wonderful: Drowned Churches and Ghostly Peals: Britain’s Lost Bells

The Origins of the Unicorn

Mimi Matthews

The Maiden and the Unicorn by Domenichino, 1602.The Maiden and the Unicorn by Domenichino, 1602.

According to historians, the legend of the unicorn first emerged in 398 BC courtesy of the Greek physician Ctesias.  Ctesias wrote an account of India, titled Indica.  He attests that all recorded within his account are things that he has witnessed himself or that he has had related to him by credible witnesses.  This account of India, though largely lost, has been preserved in a fragmentary abstract made in the 9th century by Photios I of Constantinople.  In the twenty-fifth fragment, Ctesias writes of the unicorn, stating:

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