October 1, 1918 Lawrence of Arabia – Today in History

I have been in hospital for two weeks, hence the gap in transmission.

Lawrence tried to convince his superiors that Arab independence was in their own best interest, but found himself undermined by the Sykes-Picot agreement, negotiated in secret between French and Br…

Source: October 1, 1918 Lawrence of Arabia – Today in History

A rare accolade to ” Lawrence of Arabia “ | David Hencke

Lawrence of Arabia: Pic credit: BBC

While the press has been inundated by flooding stories and fears of terrorist attacks  by Islamic State in the run up to Christmas , the government slipped out a genuine good news announcement  for fans of ” Lawrence of Arabia “.

The heritage minister, Tracey Crouch, announced that Clouds Hill, the tiny home of T E Lawrence , near Wareham in Dorset has been given Grade II * status – an Historic England  accolade given to only a few hundred buildings in England. The ruling gives its special protection.

The decision  taken 80 years after Lawrence’s death has been given no coverage by the press but is a piece of living history for anyone interested in…

Source: A rare accolade to ” Lawrence of Arabia “ | David Hencke

Lest We Forget: The Great War and Cinema – CURNBLOG

Originally posted on CURNBLOG

by Pete Johnson

This August sees the centenary of the First World War. This tragic conflict destroyed nations, took millions of lives, and changed the map of the world. Many films have been made about this war, and this seems a suitable time to examine some of them. I normally seek out lesser-known films for my posts; but on this occasion, I have decided that the circumstances warrant a reminder of the best films made about this terrible war.

At the end of hostilities in 1918, films soon began to appear. They mostly portrayed the victors, justly winning a noble and worthwhile war. Although the first film in this list is from sometime later, 1930, by which time there had been a chance to reflect on the loss, and perhaps to question the validity of all this carnage.

Please be aware that all these reviews contain plot spoilers.

All Quiet On The Western Front (1930)

So much has been written about this film, I feel little need to add more. I will though, for the benefit of anyone who has never seen it. The film is a faithful adaptation of the German novel of the same name by Erich Maria Remarque, published in 1929. Although it follows the fortunes of a group of young Germans, the film was made in the USA, directed by Louis Milestone, and starred Lew Ayres and Louis Wolheim. Like the book, the film takes an obviously anti-war stance. We see impressionable schoolboys…

Read more Lest We Forget: The Great War and Cinema – CURNBLOG