Remembering the Holocaust – and the disabled victims who died in the T4 programme

Katharine Quarmby

In this extract from my book, Scapegoat: why we are failing disabled people (Portobello, 2011), on Holocaust Memorial Day, I am sharing my analysis of how the T4 Nazi killing machine was inspired by eugenics enthusiasts in the UK and the US. It’s a grim read, I’m afraid, but important to remember why so many people died. Never again.

Extract from: Scapegoat: why we are failing disabled people (Portobello, 2011)

by Katharine Quarmby

The legitimisation of eugenic views through Europe and American ended in a logical, if horrifying outcome: the systematic murder of thousands of disabled people in Germany, after the Nazis came to power in 1933. The National Socialist Party wanted to create a pure Aryan nation, and eradicate the taint of the Jewish people (as well as homosexuals and gypsies) But a lesser known part of their moral thought was that “degenerate”, impaired Aryans should also be eliminated…

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Sheltering Jews in SW France During World War II

Life on La Lune

Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val, which had its place in protecting Jews Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val, some of whose inhabitants played a role in protecting Jews

Today, International Holocaust Remembrance Day, is the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp by Soviet troops. The unspeakable horror of these places has been described in memoirs and contemporary film footage. But very few survivors remain and it is beyond our imagination today to conceive of how it must have been.

The deportation of Jews – and other “undesirables” – from France is a deplorable page in the country’s history. However, amidst the bleakness, there were glimmers of virtue and it’s those I want to focus on.

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