easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

easter egg, handmade easter egg, handmade © IWM (EPH 641)

Physical description
A carved wooden Easter egg, in two halves, depicting on one side a painted rural scene with cottage, fields, trees and a blue sky, on the other side are large letters in gold…

via easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

The Spitfire lost for almost 50 Years | Imperial War Museums

IWM, Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a, IWM Duxford

IWM, Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a, IWM Duxford

Built at Southampton in 1939, this Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a was issued to No. 19 Squadron at RAF Duxford in April 1940. On 10 May 1940, Germany invaded France and the Low Countries, pushing the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), along with French and Belgian troops, back to the French port of Dunkirk. By the end of May 1940, Germany’s…

via The Spitfire lost for almost 50 Years | Imperial War Museums

The History Girls: Lest We Forget… by Clare Mulley

I was appalled to hear this month that cuts to the Imperial War Museum budget mean that access to the library and archives, which were hugely important during my research for Krystyna’s biography, is now going to be severely restricted if not closed, and the school education packages may be stopped. I find it incredible that, at this time of remembrance in particular, we can even consider risking losing one of the most important repositories of these stories. If you feel the same, please take a moment to sign the petition against these cuts, so that we can continue to remember, honour and consider, in an informed way.

via The History Girls: Lest We Forget… by Clare Mulley.

6 Stunning First World War Artworks by Women War Artists | Imperial War Museums

Originally posted on Imperial War Museums

The first British official war artists’ scheme was set up by the government in 1916. Although it was initially started for propaganda purposes, it evolved into a memorialising scheme that commissioned a range of significant artists who explored every aspect of the conflict.

Although several female artists were approached either by the British War Memorials Committee or the Ministry of Information, none of them completed commissions for the official schemes.

However, the Imperial War Museum did commission ten female artists through its Women’s Work Sub-Committee, which had been set up to record the varied contributions of women to the war effort. Works by two other female artists were purchased for the museum’s collection by Sir Muirhead Bone, the first official artist of the war and a significant supporter of the careers of younger artists.

The drawings and paintings shown below are the work of six women who…

Read more: 6 Stunning First World War Artworks by Women War Artists | Imperial War Museums.