Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Emmeline Pankhurst’s hunger-strike medal. © MUSEUM OF LONDON

Almost a hundred years ago, in February 1918, English women were granted the right to vote. To celebrate…

via Untold Stories of England’s Militant Suffragettes – Atlas Obscura

A Coat of Many Colours: Conserving an 18th Century Technicolour Dream Coat – The Bowes Museum’s Blog

Treatment is now complete on this stunning late 18th century coat of brown cut and voided silk velvet, adorned with polychrome floral embroidery and appliquéd net (CST.1.292.A).  The coat is part o…

Source: A Coat of Many Colours: Conserving an 18th Century Technicolour Dream Coat – The Bowes Museum’s Blog

Study, conservation and display of a rare pair of curtains from Late Antique Egypt | British Museum blog

Project curator Amandine Mérat gives us an overview of the historical background of the curtains, whilst conservators Anna Harrison and Monique Pullan describe work carried out in order to prepare them for display…

Source: Study, conservation and display of a rare pair of curtains from Late Antique Egypt | British Museum blog

Samuel Pepys At St Olave’s | Spitalfields Life

Originally posted on Spitalfields Life.

In anticipation of the forthcoming exhibition Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution opening at National Maritime Museum in Greenwich on 20th November, I visited Pepys’ parish church in the City.

stolaves

Do you see Elizabeth Pepys, leaning out from her monument and directing her gaze across the church to where Samuel sat in the gallery opposite? These days the gallery has long gone but, since her late husband became celebrated for his journal, a memorial to him was installed in 1884 where the gallery once was, which contains a portrait bust that peers back eternally at Elizabeth. They will always see eye-to-eye even if they are forever separated by the nave.

St Olave’s on the corner of Seething Lane has long been one of my favourite City churches. Dating from the eleventh century, it is a rare…

Source: Samuel Pepys At St Olave’s | Spitalfields Life

Great Plague Of London Explored In New Exhibition | Londonist

Originally posted on the Londonist.

The Square Mile’s Guildhall Library has mounted a small but informative exhibition about the Great Plague. The visitation of 1665 killed an estimated 100,000 Londoners — around a quarter of the population.

The display presents original documents and publications from the time, all drawn from the library’s unrivalled holdings. Visitors can inspect…

via Great Plague Of London Explored In New Exhibition | Londonist.

Christina Broom, London Photographer

London Historians' Blog

Portrait of Christina Livingston made three days before her marriage to Albert Edmund Broom  © Museum of London Portrait of Christina Livingston made three days before her marriage to Albert Edmund Broom © Museum of London

Christina Broom (née Livingston, 1862 – 1939) was a lone female London photographer of the Edwardian age and during World War One. Her achievements are all the more remarkable considering her small physical stature and the floor length dresses and elaborate hats she was obliged to wear at that time while lugging around cumbersome photographic equipment. Broom made a living out of postcards and also selling news images to the press. Lord Roberts and Queen Mary were among her great admirers, which helped to gain her often exclusive access to places like the Royal Mews and Wellington Barracks where she enjoyed carte blanche to shoot at will. The result was hundreds images of London’s streets and people during the early decades of the 20th Century.

In 2014 the Museum of London acquired a…

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Making histories: Captain Cook and Indigenous Australia

British Museum blog

Maria Nugent, Research Fellow, Australian National University

Objects on display in the Indigenous Australia exhibition. Objects on display in the Indigenous Australia exhibition at the British Museum, London

There is a corner (literally) in the BP exhibition Indigenous Australia: enduring civilisation that features the famous British navigator Captain James Cook. It occurs at a pivotal point, where the exhibition’s narrative moves from the hard-to-fathom timescales of the Dreaming (the complex system of beliefs and stories that explain the meaningful creation of the world, and how humans reproduce that system through ceremony, art, storytelling and other meaningful action, which one anthropologist described as an ‘everywhen’) and the 40,000 plus years of human occupation of the continent, to the much shorter and more immediate timespan of the last 245 years since British encounters with Indigenous people there began. While Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese voyagers had visited since the early 1600s, Cook was the first British navigator to explore the region…

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Conservation of a Clove Boat

British Museum blog

Verena Kotonski, Specialist Conservator (Organics), British Museum

In November 2014, my workbench temporarily turned into something close to a shipyard when a model boat made of cloves arrived in the Organic Artefacts Conservation Studio. Every object that goes on temporary or permanent display at the Museum receives a thorough condition check and, if necessary, conservation treatment before its installation in an exhibition. The clove boat was to be included in the exhibition Connecting continents: Indian Ocean trade and exchange, in which it was to be displayed for the very first time.

I have come across many weird and wonderful objects over the years, but never a boat made of cloves! I was particularly looking forward to unpacking this object from its storage box to see what it looked like. When I opened the box, an almost overpowering smell of cloves was released, which was somewhat of a surprise as this…

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At the Museum of London, the City That Sherlock Holmes Knew – NYTimes.com

LONDON — A riveting exhibition here at the Museum of London has capitalized on the full-blown Sherlockmania that seems to have seized the Western world, judging by a new spate of movies, television shows and books.

Unexpectedly, the show, “Sherlock Holmes: The Man Who Never Lived and Will Never Die,” which has drawn record numbers to the museum and continues until April 12, does not focus on the stories about Holmes or his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, though an opening section shows some early notebooks and illustrations as well as a rare portrait of the author in his 30s.

“We deliberately didn’t want to make it a text and manuscript-heavy library exhibition,” said Alex Werner, the lead curator. “It’s about the character, and although I had a bit of trepidation about putting on an exhibition about a fictional being, we tried to set him firmly against the real city of London in which the stories…

Continue reading: At the Museum of London, the City That Sherlock Holmes Knew – NYTimes.com.

Two Nerdy History Girls: An Upcoming Exhibition for Lovers of Historical Shoes

Anyone who reads this blog knows our great love for shoes. We’re not shy about it; we state it right up front, over there beneath our selfie.

With that in mind, I’m delighted to announce an upcoming exhibition devoted not only to historical shoes, but also the women who wore them. Cosmopolitan Consumption: New England Shoe Stories 1750-1850 will be opening on Valentine’s Day (how appropriate!) at the Portsmouth Athenaeum, Portsmouth, NH, and will run through June 5, 2015. Over forty pairs of shoes borrowed from various collections will be featured as well as a number of costumes and accessories, and admission is free. The 1750 print of The Shoe Peddler, above left, appears on the invitations to the exhibition, and the peddler’s wares hint at the diversity of the show as well.

One of this blog’s good friends, Dr. Kimberly Alexander, is co-curator of the exhibition, and she has generously shared advance photos of several of shoes with us.  In the past,”the ankle and instep were considered…

Continue reading: Two Nerdy History Girls: An Upcoming Exhibition for Lovers of Historical Shoes.

Sunken Egyptian treasure gets European tour

A marble head of Antonia Minor, the mother of the Roman emperor Claudius,  found in the Alexandria harbour [Credit: Christoph Gerigk,  © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation] Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.gr/2014/10/sunken-egyptian-treasure-gets-european.html#.VFIJK778tyE Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook

A marble head of Antonia Minor, the mother of the Roman emperor Claudius, found in the Alexandria harbour [Credit: Christoph Gerigk, © Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation]

An exhibition featuring artefacts discovered off the coast of Egypt is set to tour Europe. “Egypt’s Sunken Secrets” is organised by Franck Goddio, the founder of the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology, in association with Egypt’s Ministry of State for Antiquities. Artefacts have been selected from museums across the country, including 18 from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, while over 200 come from recent underwater explorations by Goddio’s team…

Read more at: archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com

The black Victorians: astonishing portraits unseen for 120 years | Art and design | theguardian.com

The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, a royal residence on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.

“The portraits were last shown in the London Illustrated News in 1891,” says Renée Mussai, who has co-curated the show at London’s Rivington Place alongside Mark Sealy MBE, director of Autograph ABP, a foundation that focuses on black cultural identity often through the use of overlooked archives. “The Hulton Archive, where they came from, did not even know they existed until we uncovered them while excavating…

Read more: The black Victorians: astonishing portraits unseen for 120 years | Art and design | theguardian.com.