Lost to the Night: The Lancaster Crew | The Rant Foundry

Filed in: War History  –  Author: JF Dowsett

At the Binbrook RAF flying base in Lincolnshire, Britain during April 1944, the crew of a Lancaster bomber were posing – in their spare t…

Source: Lost to the Night: The Lancaster Crew | The Rant Foundry

Bulgarian Archaeologists Discover 11th Century Rakia Distillation Vessel | Ancientfoods

Original Article:
July 27, 2015
novitine.com

Bulgarian archaeologists recently discovered an 11th century fragment of a distillation vessel used for the production of the country’s traditional fruit brandy, which is known as rakia.

The fragment was uncovered during the excavation works, which are being conducted by the National Historical Museum (NIM) at the medieval Lyutitsa fortress.

The fortress is situated on a hill above the town of Ivaylovgrad and the find was discovered by the team of archaeologist Filip Petrunov, press statement of NIM informs.

This is the second vessel for the distillation of rakia to be uncovered at the fortress and the third one in Bulgaria.The first vessel at Lyutitsa was found in…

Source: Bulgarian Archaeologists Discover 11th Century Rakia Distillation Vessel | Ancientfoods

Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to the Austro-Hungarian Mission, 25 July 1914 – Part IV | The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014

Originally posted on The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014.

Leopold Count Berchtold

On 25 July 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Leopold Count Berchtold (pictured), circulated a memoir to all Austro-Hungarian diplomatic missions. The memoir formed the basis of Austria-Hungary’s view of Serbia, and the Dual Monarchy’s rational during the July Crisis. From the Austro-Hungarian perspective, it lists the different forms of Serbian aggression endured since the beginning of the century, culminating in the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife at Sarajevo. The following is part IV of the memoir.

Circular Note to the Austro-Hungarian Mission. Vienna, 25 July 1914.

A few months previously, research with regard to treasonable propaganda had been instituted on Luka Aljinovicz’s account. In the course of these investigations three witnesses had testified against Aljinovicz, who, they said had in 1913 received 100 dinar from the Narodna odbrana for purposes of propaganda, but more especially for an attempt upon the life of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and a secret student society had given him the same sum.

This shows how the criminal agitation of the Narodna odbrana was recently concentrated upon the person of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

All these facts lead to the conclusion that the Narodjia odbrana, and the elements hostile to Austria-Hungary grouped around it, had recently considered the…

via Austro-Hungarian Red Book: Count Berchtold to the Austro-Hungarian Mission, 25 July 1914 – Part IV | The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014.

On This Day in 1929 – The Birth of Anne Frank

The York Historian

Annelis Marie Frank, or Anne Frank, is incredibly famous for her diary, which was published in 1947 by her father, Otto Frank. As the story commonly goes, she was a victim of the Holocaust and hid in an annex until she was discovered and met a tragic death at the hands of the Nazis. It is after this point that most people draw a blank. You might know the odd person who has read her diary and is able to comment that it is a deeply moving coming of age tale against the backdrop of the struggle she facedAnne Frank's Diary under Nazi occupation.

On this day, as we remember Anne Frank coming into the world, let us take the opportunity to learn more about her story.

Anne Frank was the younger of two children and had a sister called Margot, who was three years older than her. In 1933, when Anne…

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Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015

First Night History

Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler
Prints of Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler are available to buy at FirstNightVintage

Related


Originally posted on Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

A call is going out to the nation and beyond to find descendants of those who fought in the Battle of Waterloo, the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe, ahead of the 200th anniversary of the Battle in 2015.

On 18th June 1815, one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever was fought by the Duke of Wellington and his allied army, bringing to an end a long campaign against the might of Napoleon Bonaparte. Over rolling countryside between two ridges, 11 miles south of Brussels, the entire course of European history changed as Napoleon was defeated, ending his leadership of the French Empire. Waterloo literally means ‘wet meadow’ and the condition of the…

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How Churchill Tricked America Into War With the Lusitania Conspiracy

WebInvestigator.KK.org - by F. Kaskais

How Churchill Tricked America Into War With the Lusitania Conspiracy

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Baron Giesl is Asked to Present a Note to Serbia: 20 July 1914

Featured Image -- 984

The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014

On 20 July 1914, Count Berchtold sent a momentous telegram to Wladimir Giesl von Gieslingen, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to Serbia. In it, he asks his minister to present an ultimatum to Serbia on 23 July, along with its text.

Count Berchtold to Baron von Giesl. Vienna, 20 July 1914.

You are asked to present the following note to the Royal government on the afternoon of the 23rd of July, not later than between four and five o’clock.

“On the 31rst March 1909 the Royal Servian Minister at the court of Vienna by order of his government made the following declaration before the Imperial and Royal government: ‘Servia acknowledges that none of its rights have been
touched by the situation created in Bosnia and Herzegovina and that it will therefore accomodate itself to the decisionswhich the powers will resolve with regard to the article XXV of the Treaty of Berlin. Servia, in following the advice of the Great Powers…

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Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015

Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler
Prints of Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler are available to buy at FirstNightVintage

Related


Originally posted on Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

A call is going out to the nation and beyond to find descendants of those who fought in the Battle of Waterloo, the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe, ahead of the 200th anniversary of the Battle in 2015.

On 18th June 1815, one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever was fought by the Duke of Wellington and his allied army, bringing to an end a long campaign against the might of Napoleon Bonaparte. Over rolling countryside between two ridges, 11 miles south of Brussels, the entire course of European history changed as Napoleon was defeated, ending his leadership of the French Empire. Waterloo literally means ‘wet meadow’ and the condition of the ground on the day was such that shoes and cannon balls simply disappeared by their hundreds into the mud.

Though the Duke was outnumbered in both men and cannon, his tactical skill and staying power resulted in an outcome that decided the future of Europe, becoming a milestone in…

via Hunt is on for Battle of Waterloo descendants for 200th anniversary in 2015 | Waterloo 200 | 1815 – 2015.

Sarajevo: 28 June 1914

The July Crisis: 100 Years On, 1914-2014

Archuduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie, the Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by Gavrilo Princip while on tour in Sarajevo. The following are newspaper excerpts recounting the events at Sarajevo.  

SPECIAL CABLE TO THE NEW YORK TIMES.

Sarajevo, Bosnia, June 28,- Archduke Francis Ferdinand successor to
the throne of Austria-Hungary, and his wife, the Duchess of Hohenberg,
were shot and killed by a Bosnian student here today. The fatal shooting
was the second attempt upon the lives of the couple during the day, and is believed to have been the result of a political conspiracy.

This morning, as Archduke Francis Ferdinand and the Duchess were
driving to a reception at the Town Hall a bomb was thrown at their motor
car. The Archduke pushed it off with his arm.

The bomb did not explode until after the Archduke’s car had passed
on, and the occupants of the next car, Count…

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Early Toys: The Jigsaw or Dissected Puzzle

Jane Austen's World

When Fanny Price first arrived at Mansfield Park, her cousins  found her ignorant on many things. “Dear mama, only think, my cousin cannot put the map of Europe together.”  The girls  were referring to dissected geography puzzles, now known as jigsaw puzzles, that had first made their appearance in Europe in the 18th century and were popularized and widely used in England and America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Mansfield Park makes one of the earliest references to this educational way of teaching of geography. While Fanny Price’s cousins teased her for not being familiar with these expensive new schoolroom toys, the truth was that her Portsmouth parents could not afford them.

At the turn of the 18th century,  British companies began to make toys that are still favorites today: toy soldiers, farmyards, wooden building blocks, steam engines, and kaleidoscopes. The toymaking industry began to boom, making mass-produced toys…

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