Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire? | Byzantine Blog

The majesty of Istanbul’s ‘Blue Mosque’ (Tetra Images/Getty Images)

It was one of the most resilient empires in world history, but how did it start? And why did it end?

This article was first published in the May 2016 issue of History Revealed

Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire?

That’s a debate that is hard to fit into a nutshell. But, the ever-changing world power – an Islāmic network of countries comprising much of the Mediterranean coast (besides Italy) – began in 1299 and did not conclude until 1922.

This means that it certainly outstripped the British Empire in terms of…

Source: Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire? | Byzantine Blog

Marius and the Volunteer Army

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At Cannae, in Southern Italy, the Army of the Roman Republic faced Hannibal in the 2nd Punic War.

At the time a Roman citizen could not “join” the Army; it was an honor reserved for those of property and standing.  It was expected of those with property and standing.  It was not expected of the poor.  It would be another hundred years before Gaius Marius allowed “ordinary” citizens to enlist.

At the time of Cannae  the standard requirements to become a Roman soldier were very…

Source: Marius and the Volunteer Army

Why Allen Dulles Killed the Kennedys

By now there’s not nearly as much disagreement regarding what happened to John and Robert Kennedy as major communications corporations would have you believe. While every researcher and author highlights different details, there isn’t any serious disagreement among, say, Jim Douglass’ JFK and the Unspeakable, Howard Hunt’sdeathbed confession, and David Talbot’s new The Devil’s Chessboard.

Jon Schwarz says The Devil’s Chessboard confirms that “your darkest suspicions about how the world operates are likely an underestimate. Yes, there is an amorphous group of unelected corporate lawyers, bankers, and intelligence and military officials who form an American ‘deep state,’ setting real limits on the rare politicians who ever try to get out of line.”

For those of us who were already convinced of that up to our eyeballs, Talbot’s book is still one of the best I’ve seen on the Dulles brothers and one of the best I’ve seen on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Where it differs from Douglass’ book, I think, is not so much in the evidence it relates or the conclusions it draws, but in providing…

Source: Why Allen Dulles Killed the Kennedys

5 of August 1824 Greek War of Independence #Onthisday | GroovyHistorian

Originally posted on GroovyHistorian.

5 of August , 1824 : Greek War of independence : Constantine Kanaris leads a Greek fleet to victory against Ottoman and Egyptian Ships in the battle of Samos. via 5 of August 1824 Greek War of Independence #Onthisday | GroovyHistorian.

c. 1858: Photos of Veterans of the Napoleonic Wars

Grenadier Burg, 24th Regiment of the Guard, 1815
IMAGE: BROWN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Napoléon Bonaparte’s final defeat was the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Even after his death in 1821, the surviving soldiers of Grande Armée revered his historic leadership. Each year on May 5, the anniversary of Napoléon’s death, the veterans marched to Paris’ Place Vendôme in full uniform to pay respects to their emperor.

These photographs were taken on one of these occasions, possibly in 1858. All the men — at this time in their 70s and 80s — are wearing the Saint Helena medals, issued in August 1857 to all veterans of the wars of the revolution and the empire.

These are the only surviving images of veterans of the Grande Armée and the Guard actually wearing their original uniforms and insignia…

via c. 1858: Photos of Veterans of the Napoleonic Wars.

Christopher Columbus Was Even Worse Than You Thought‏; Bankrupting an Empire!

| truthaholics

Christopher Columbus Was Even Worse Than You Thought‏;
Bankrupting an Empire! Stefan Molyneux.
Happy Columbus Day! Millions of people throughout the world will commemorate the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the New World.

Media outlets generally don’t shy away from exposing the truth about this American hero and most people who educate themselves outside the propaganda vacuum of public schools know that in the 21st century the man would be put on trial for crimes against humanity – well, unless he managed to reach the summit of political power.

There is, however, one aspect of Columbus’ sins that gets ignored.

When he set sail for what turned out to be the American continent, he carried with him the commandment of King Ferdinand of Spain: “Get gold, humanely if possible, but at all hazards – get gold!”

In his lust for gold, Columbus robbed and forced the…

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Julia Margaret Cameron in Ceylon: Idylls of Freshwater vs. Idylls of Rathoongodde | The Public Domain Review

Originally posted on The Public Domain Review.

Photograph of a Sinhalese woman by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1875

Photograph of a Sinhalese woman by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1875

Leaving her close-knit artistic community on the Isle of Wight at the age of sixty to join her husband on the coffee plantations of Ceylon was not an easy move for the celebrated British photographer Julia Margaret Cameron. Eugenia Herbert explores the story behind the move and how the new environment was to impact Cameron’s art.

The Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron is currently undergoing a revival with a recent exhibition of her work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. She has long evoked interest not only because of her distinctive style but also because of her eccentric personality, her dominant — very dominant — role in a circle that in many ways prefigured the Bloomsbury of her grandniece, Virginia Woolf. But there was another strand in her life that was quintessentially Victorian: the imperial. She was daughter, wife and mother of Empire. To top it off, four of her five sisters…

Read more Julia Margaret Cameron in Ceylon: Idylls of Freshwater vs. Idylls of Rathoongodde | The Public Domain Review.

Host City Glasgow: signs of slavery and the imperial past are never far away

Originally posted on Host City Glasgow

The “second city of empire” was how this year’s host of the Commonwealth Games used to be well-known. Glasgow’s imperial past is hinted at by names littered throughout the city centre, in geographic pointers such as Virginia Street and Jamaica Street; and tributes to tobacco barons in the likes of Buchanan Street and Ingram Street.

A quarter of the world’s locomotives and a fifth of its ships were built on the banks of the river Clyde in the second half of the 19th century. These were used primarily to transport goods and people around the empire. The route from Glasgow to America was much shorter than the passage from London. As a result, goods such as tobacco, cotton and sugar were all transported and stored by the Clyde. More tobacco was transported through Glasgow than the rest of the United Kingdom combined. This added to the wealth of so-called “tobacco lords”. Beyond street names, the city is still littered…

Read more Host City Glasgow: signs of slavery and the imperial past are never far away.