Poverty in early Edwardian London | In Times Gone By…

Adelaide Springett was ashamed of her tattered boots and so took them off for her photograph, taken in 1901. The children who were photographed at the end of the Victorian and in the Edwardian eras…

Source: Poverty in early Edwardian London | In Times Gone By…

On this day: the death of a war hero | In Times Gone By…

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d’honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915. A 1919 painting depicting the moment th…

Source: On this day: the death of a war hero | In Times Gone By…

On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard | In Times Gone By…

In 1905

In 1905 Kate Sheppard, New Zealand’s most famous suffragette, died on the 13th of July, 1934. Born to Scottish parents in England in 1847, Sheppard moved to New Zealand in 1869. She became a …

Source: On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard | In Times Gone By…

On this day… | In Times Gone By…

On the 13th of March, 1901, the new King Edward VII of Great Britain appeared in a caricature on the cover of Puck magazine. Edward had been king for less than two months, following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria, in January.

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On this day: the Lusitania arrives in the United States

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The Lusitania at end of record voyage 1907

The RMS Lusitania arrives in New York on the 13th of September, 1907.

At 9:05am on the 13th of September, 1907, the RMS Lusitania completed her maiden voyage from England.

The voyage from Liverpool, England via Ireland on what was then the world’s largest ocean liner had taken five days (and fifty-something minutes) to complete.

Drawing of the First class dining saloon of the RMS Lusitania (style Louis XVI) Dining Saloon of the RMS Lusitania 1906..

Promotional material for the ship’s first class dining room, alongside a photograph of the same scene.

The Lusitania stayed in New York for a week before departing again for England. During that time she was made available for tours.

RMS Lusitania arriving in New York on her maiden voyage.

New York, September 1907.

The ocean liner’s career would end when she was sunk by a German U-boat in the First World War, killing 1198 of the 1959 people on board.

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On this day: the Black Tom explosion

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Aftermath of the Black Tom explosion, an act of sabotage on American ammunition supplies by German agents which took place on July 30, 1916 in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Black Tom pier photographed on the 31st of July, 1916, a day and a half after the explosion.

On the 30th of July, 1916, German agents blew up a pier in New Jersey, USA in an attempt to sabotage American-made munitions intended for World War One.

The worst of the explosions took place at 2:08am, by which point some guards had fled at the sight of fire, knowing what was to come.

The explosion was so great some of the fragments became lodged in the Statue of Liberty, and a clock was stopped over a mile away. The time was frozen at 2:12am.

Map of Jersey City, NJ circa 1905 showing location of Black Tom.

It is estimated that seven people were killed. Hundreds were injured, and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia and Maryland.

It was later revealed that a Slovak immigrant, who had earlier served in the US Army, was responsible for the explosions, and…

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On this day: Queen Victoria died in 1901

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Death of Queen Victoria 22nd January 1901

On the 22nd of January, 1901, Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland died at the age of eighty-one.

A woman who inherited the throne at eighteen, she reigned for sixty-three years and seven months and was Britain’s longest-serving monarch, as well as the world’s longest-serving female monarch.

Queen Victoria receiving the news of her accession to the throne, 20 June 1837.

Queen Victoria receiving the news of her accession to the throne, 20 June 1837.

She was buried in a white dress and her wedding veil, as she had left instructions for her funeral to be white. Her death marked the end of the Victorian era and the beginning of the Edwardian Era.

799px-Queen_Victoria_Prince_Albert_and_their_nine_children

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