Churchill statue ‘may have to be put in museum’, says granddaughter – BBC News

A statue of Winston Churchill may have to be put in a museum to protect it if demonstrations continue, his granddaughter has said.

Emma Soames told the BBC the war-time prime minister was a “complex man” but he was considered a hero by millions..

She said she was “shocked” to see the monument in London’s Parliament Square boarded up, although she said she understood why this…

Source: Churchill statue ‘may have to be put in museum’, says granddaughter – BBC News

The Mysterious Erich von Richthofen – Beachcombing’s Bizarre History Blog

Originally posted on Beachcombing’s Bizarre History Blog.

Baron Manfred von Richthofen [The Red Baron]

The King and Country debate has been described previously on this blog. It was a talk at Oxford Students’ Union 9 Feb 1933, which saw 275 to 153 students vote for the motion ‘that this House will in no circumstances fight for its King and Country’. This surprisingly pacifist stance from a major British institution attracted first British then international attention. Beach argued in the previous post that the influence of the debate was certainly felt on the streets in other countries: it damaged British prestige or at least gave the sense that Britain was supine in a decade when it would need to be martial and energetic. However, it was also noted that the evidence that the debate swung opinions in the German high command was slight. The only evidence for this comes down, in fact, to (i) some bombastic words from Churchill and…

via The Mysterious Erich von Richthofen – Beachcombing’s Bizarre History Blog.

street holocaust memorials munich – artnet News

The small Holocaust memorials are a common sight across Europe. Photo: TAZ

The small Holocaust memorials are a common sight across Europe.
Photo: TAZ

Since 1997 many cities and towns all over Europe have placed small brass-plated concrete blocks commemorating victims of Nazi persecution into pavements on the sites of Holocaust victims’ last residences.

While most municipalities have welcomed the memorial project, initiated by the Cologne-based sculptor Gunter Demnig, Munich has resisted the initiative for over a decade as politicians and Jewish groups continue to debate its appropriateness, the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung reports.

In 2004 the Munich City Council voted against the project following extensive debates. In an official statement the council announced that it did not want to commemorate the victims “on the dirty streets,” and that memorials should “not be walked over.”

Weighing in on the debate, the Mayor of Munich, Christian Ude, said that he was wary of the “trivialization of Remembrance,” preferring the establishment of a…

Continue reading: street holocaust memorials munich – artnet News.