These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them

Portrait of Ethel Smyth, 1901, John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Ethel Smyth (1858 – 1944), 1901, John Singer Sargent

Role-models matter as much as they ever did but women are also significantly under-represented in our history books. Their absence has taken its toll: a 2016 survey carried out by English Heritage revealed that 40 percent of us believe men have had a greater impact on history than women. It’s a misconception, of course. Women have always excelled, we just haven’t easily been able to read their stories because the omission has…

via These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them – The i – Weekend Reads #30

To celebrate to commemorate: John Wall Callcott (1766 – 1821) | MusiCB3 Blog

Source: To celebrate to commemorate: John Wall Callcott (1766 – 1821) | MusiCB3 Blog

John Wall Callcott (1766 – 1821) is synonymous with the Glee, that quintessentially English unaccompanied sentimental part-song, usually for male voices, popular in the 18th and early 19th century for the enjoyment of which the Noblemen and Gentlemen’s Catch Club was founded in 1761, and which awarded prizes for different types of glee and catch. Callcott, the 250th anniversary of whose birth we celebrate this year, produced somewhere upwards of 150 glees in his lifetime and his reputation as a composer of these works was sealed when he won no fewer than three of the Catch Club prizes in 1785.

So successful was Callcott composing in this idiom, that he went on to win prizes at the…

Source: To celebrate to commemorate: John Wall Callcott (1766 – 1821) | MusiCB3 Blog

14-18-NOW: Soldiering On and Resemblance

Soldiering On – Jez Colborne

Learning-disabled people don’t go to war. Not officially anyway. Not nowadays. They are the ones left behind. Composer and musician Jez Colborne is seduced by the pomp and ceremony surrounding war: the camaraderie, the camouflage, the marching bands and parades. The only thing he doesn’t like is the killing. In collaboration with Mind the Gap this pop-music style video features an original song composed and performed by Jez, set in and old cinema playing silent films from WW1. It explores the contradiction between Jez’s desire to be part of an experience he is locked out of… and his horror at the brutal reality of war.

Resemblance – Claire Cunningham 

A solo performance created around the act of assembling (and disassembling) a crutch in the manner of a soldier assembling his gun. Enacting a ritual that mirrors the act of creating a weapon of destruction, when actually creating an object of support. Looking at the balance between creation and destruction, supply and demand and human and object, the film also acknowledges and honours the role of women munitions workers in WW1, and question the preconceptions we make about objects and their ‘users’, or indeed their ‘makers’.

See more: 14-18-NOW