Obituary: Millie Dunn Veasey, pioneering sergeant turned rights activist – BBC News

6888TH MONUMENT COMMITTEE Millie Dunn Veasey and her unit's contribution to WW2 was "huge", one expert said

6888TH MONUMENT COMMITTEE Millie Dunn Veasey and her unit’s contribution to WW2 was “huge”, one expert said

via Obituary: Millie Dunn Veasey, pioneering sergeant turned rights activist – BBC News

Nina Simone’s Live Performances of Her Poignant Civil Rights Protest Songs | Open Culture

When armored troops and tanks arrived in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, advancing on civilians with guns drawn and launching tear gas canisters into the crowd, more than a few people watching it happen exclaimed, “Missouri Goddam!” After the Charleston, SC massacre last summer, many exclaimed, “South Carolina Goddam!” The phrases directly reference an earlier, all too similar, time in the violent history of civil rights struggles, 1964, when Nina Simone wrote and performed “Mississippi Goddam” (above in Holland). It was “a song that would change her career,” writes Matt Staggs at Signature, “complicating her relationship with the white establishment while cementing her allegiance with the civil rights movement.”

After her ambitions as a concert pianist were frustrated, Simone rose to fame as a brilliantly talented performer of classical, jazz, folk, blues, and cabaret music. She “did not so much interpret songs,” writes Adam Shatz in the New York Review of Books, “as take…

Source: Nina Simone’s Live Performances of Her Poignant Civil Rights Protest Songs | Open Culture

10 Women Who Refused to Give Up Their Seats Before Rosa Parks | Saints, Sisters, and Sluts

Originally posted on Saints, Sisters, and Sluts.

When Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on the bus, the community didn’t hesitate to rally around her and begin the Montgomery Bus Boycott. She was a pillar in the community with an unimpeachable character. She was also an activist with experience in the civil rights movement, and the perfect person to give a face to the struggle.

Rosa was seated in the “colored section” of the bus when the “white section” filled up and the driver told her to move. She refused to obey and was subsequently arrested. Her action prompted the Montgomery Bus Boycott. She was an active civil rights worker and at the time secretary of the Montgomery Chapter of the NAACP. Although her court case became bogged down in state courts, her action, the boycott, and the successful case of Browder v. Gayle, finally brought about desegregation of the city’s bus system.

This post is intended in no way to take away from what Mrs. Parks did. Rather it is to highlight the fact that there were many brave women who took similar actions…

via 10 Women Who Refused to Give Up Their Seats Before Rosa Parks | Saints, Sisters, and Sluts.