Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Who would have thought that a tiny small square piece of stone, glass or pottery called tesserae would have such an important impact on culture and art history? As far back as the fourth millennium, on the walls of the Uruk in Mesopotamia, pieces of coloured stone cones were inlaid in a pattern, that bear a resemblance to mosaics. In the period of ancient history, more familiar to us though, the Greeks and pre-Christian Romans, enriched the floors of Hellenistic villas and Roman dwellings with magnificent mosaics. Mosaics were made almost always strictly for the rich, in painstaking detail, by the best artists of the day. Some of the most popular subjects for mosaics in ancient Greece and Rome were…

Source: Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Byzantine ‘flat-pack’ church to be reconstructed in Oxford after spending 1,000 years on the seabed

Centuries before the Swedes started flat-packing their furniture, the Holy Roman Emperor Justinian had his own version, sending self-assembly churches to newly conquered parts of his empire.

From the Independent.

Now one of the “Ikea-style” churches, which spent more than 1,000 years on a seabed after the ship carrying it sank, is to be reconstructed for the first time in Oxford.

The Byzantine church will be on display at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology as part of the exhibition

Source: Byzantine ‘flat-pack’ church to be reconstructed in Oxford after spending 1,000 years on the seabed