Lost to the Night: The Lancaster Crew | The Rant Foundry

Filed in: War History  –  Author: JF Dowsett

At the Binbrook RAF flying base in Lincolnshire, Britain during April 1944, the crew of a Lancaster bomber were posing – in their spare t…

Source: Lost to the Night: The Lancaster Crew | The Rant Foundry

The 1884 Colchester Earthquake | In Times Gone By…

The back of the Ship at Launch pub in Wivenhoe. On the 22nd of April, 1884 an earthquake hit Colchester, England. The disaster occurred at 9:18am. The earthquake measured 4.6 on the Richter scale…

Source: The 1884 Colchester Earthquake | In Times Gone By…

Sutton Hoo?

sutton.hoo_.helmetIn 624, at a windswept English coastal town with the comical name of Sutton Hoo, the royal ship of an Anglo-Saxon King was loaded to the gunwales with treasures beyond compare. Its manifest would list piles of precious metals, jewel-encrusted odds and ends, rare coins, arms from the far north, tableware from the far south and above all, a spectacular golden war helmet. The whole shining ship, 90 feet of overreaching opulence from stem to stern, mocked the dusk into which the sovereign’s world was lapsing. When at last, every artifact had been neatly stowed and the King brought aboard, the vessel embarked upon one final voyage home. Its strange journey did not head out over the seas, but rather into the Earth and covered over with dirt until a mound rose up from the hole. The ship traveled into a darkness very much like that which Western Civilization itself was falling, for this was the…

Source: Sutton Hoo?

Terms of Enlistment

In Times Gone By...

Terms of enlistment in Britain. August, 1914.

Source

400px-New_Army_Terms_of_Enlistment_poster_Aug_1914_IWM

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Josef Jakobs – the Last Execution At The Tower Of London.

Crime Scribe

 Josef Jakobs, the last person executed at the Tower of London.
Josef Jakobs, the last person executed at the Tower of London.

The Tower of London, nowadys a popular tourist destination. Once also a prison, defensive fortress, a crime scene (if you believe, as I do, that the ‘Princes in the Tower’ were murdered here) and also the site of a number of execution. Anne Boleyn, Lady Jane Grey (who was the shortest-reigning Queen in British history, in office for only nine days), and of host of others. And it’s one of those others that we’re looking at today.

If you’re thinking, as so many do, that the Tower’s reputation for executions ended in medieval times then you’d be wrong. 11 German spies were shot there in the First World War and one in the Second. He was Josef Jakobs from Luxembourg, executed by firing squad on August 15, 1941, who holds the grim distinction of being the last prisoner executed…

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English Historical Fiction Authors: The Lesser Known Smugglers of the North

Originally posted on English Historical Fiction Authors.

The very image of smugglers is an evocative one. A complex network of sailors, riders, merchants and more, working beneath the very nose of the dreaded excise. Illegal landings at night, secreting away goods by starlight, hiding in caves, crossing lonely moors, for the contraband to end up in the heart of vast port cities like London, only to be sold side by side with goods that have had their tax paid.

Britain in the eighteenth century was rife with smuggling, and even though the South coast is notorious for the exploits of these criminals, the North East and Yorkshire were far from innocent… But why did smuggling exist? And why was it so prolific for…

via English Historical Fiction Authors: The Lesser Known Smugglers of the North.

On this day: The Blitz, 1943.

In Times Gone By...

“Two bewildered old ladies stand amid the levelled ruins of the alms-house which was Home; until Jerry dropped his bombs. Total war knows no bounds.”

Alms-house bombed Feb. 10, Newbury, Berks., England.” Photograph taken 11th February, 1943.

Source

ww2Two bewildered old ladies stand amid the levelled ruins of the almshouse which was HomeAlmshouse bombed  10 Newbury   Photograph taken 11th February

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On this day: Queen Victoria died in 1901

In Times Gone By...

Death of Queen Victoria 22nd January 1901

On the 22nd of January, 1901, Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland died at the age of eighty-one.

A woman who inherited the throne at eighteen, she reigned for sixty-three years and seven months and was Britain’s longest-serving monarch, as well as the world’s longest-serving female monarch.

Queen Victoria receiving the news of her accession to the throne, 20 June 1837.

Queen Victoria receiving the news of her accession to the throne, 20 June 1837.

She was buried in a white dress and her wedding veil, as she had left instructions for her funeral to be white. Her death marked the end of the Victorian era and the beginning of the Edwardian Era.

799px-Queen_Victoria_Prince_Albert_and_their_nine_children

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