Last Battle Of World War II In Europe Fought In Odzak/Croatia

Croatia, the War, and the Future

Odzak, Croatia, May 1945 Last Battle of World War II in Europe Croatian soldiers and volunteer defenders assemle Odzak, Croatia, May 1945
Last Battle of World War II in Europe
Croatian soldiers and volunteer defenders assemle

May 2015 has been the month during which the world remembered the 70th anniversary of VE (Victory in Europe) – World War II victories, defeats, victims and heroes. It was on 8 May 1945 that the Allied forces accepted the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany, marking the end of the war in Europe. But it was not the end of WWII – not in Europe. It would also take another three months before Japan surrendered to end WWII elsewhere.
In Europe, World War II ended days later than what the world widely believes – i.e. that it was 8 May 1945. It’s generally considered that the last big battle of WWII in Europe was the so-called Georgian uprising on the Netherlands’ island of Texel, which ended in enormous losses for both sides…

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The Battle of Neretva ….

AnAdventureInBosnia

The battle @ River Neretva The battle @ River Neretva

It was the winter of 1943….

Sounds of heavy artillery filled the air….,

tankers rolling closer and fighter planes roaring and swooped past above firing rapidly …

150 000 Nazi army was approaching, like an impenetrable wall slowly closing in on the 12,000 Partisan soldiers.

The Partisan soldiers were exhausted and many were wounded. In addition, typhoid disease struck, driving some to madness. Forced to the edge of this very area….

There was a bridge …. but opposite at the other end, 15,000 Chetniks and Fascists were approaching as well. The Partisan Army destroyed the bridge to prevent this force from approaching via this side.

With the bridge broken, the Fascists and Chetniks relaxed, thinking that it would be a matter of time as the Partisans were now surrounded by the Nazis with no other way out.

In the last moment of hope, a brilliant…

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WWI: Four letters from Vienna

Edinburgh Eye

M. Yov. M. Yovanovitch, the Serbian Minister at Vienna, wrote three letters to Nikola Pašić, the Prime Minister of Serbia and Minister for Foreign Affairs from Vienna on 15th July 1914.

First:

The most important question for us is, what, if any, are the intentions of the Austro-Hungarian Government as regards the Serajevo outrage. Until now I have been unable to find this out, and my other colleagues are in a similar position. The word has now been passed round here not to tell anybody anything.

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