These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them

Portrait of Ethel Smyth, 1901, John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Ethel Smyth (1858 – 1944), 1901, John Singer Sargent

Role-models matter as much as they ever did but women are also significantly under-represented in our history books. Their absence has taken its toll: a 2016 survey carried out by English Heritage revealed that 40 percent of us believe men have had a greater impact on history than women. It’s a misconception, of course. Women have always excelled, we just haven’t easily been able to read their stories because the omission has…

via These incredible women were left out of the blue plaque scheme. It’s time to commemorate them – The i – Weekend Reads #30

10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

fanny-burney-plaqueMuch has been made about the dearth of women featured on blue plaques in this 150th year [2016] of the scheme – according to English Heritage, only 13 per cent of the 900 odd blue plaques in London …

Source: 10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

Lost London – The Great Conduit…

Exploring London

CheapsideLocated at the junction of Cheapside and Poultry, the Great Conduit, also known as the Cheapside Standard, was a famous medieval public fountain.

The Great Conduit (the word conduit refers to column fountains fitted with ‘cocks’ or taps for dispensing the water) gave access to water piped using gravity four kilometres from the Tyburn into the City largely via lead pipes.

It was constructed by the City Corporation from the mid-13th century after King Henry III approved the project in 1237. It was rectangular-shaped timber building with an elevated lead tank inside from which the water was drawn.

It took the name ‘Great’ after further conduits were built further west in Cheapside in the 1390s. There were at least 15 conduits or standards scattered about the City by the time of the Great Fire in 1666.

It was rebuilt several times over its life, notably in the reign of King Henry VI, but after being severely…

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Five Cockney Poets | HistoryLondon

First Night Design

Originally posted on HistoryLondon.

Was it something in the water? Wandering around the City of London’s Square Mile I have been surprised to learn that five of England’s greatest poets were born here, within a few hundred yards of each other, in a concentration of poetic genius I would hazard is not surpassed anywhere else in the world.

The lives of the five: John Milton, Alexander Pope, Thomas Gray, John Keats and Thomas Hood, occupied a key period of about 250 years of London’s history from 1600 to 1850. Their poetic styles were very different, and none of them, except perhaps Hood, is remembered particularly as a London writer, but I thought it would be interesting to find out what they had to say about their home city.

In 1608, John Milton was born an unquestioned Cockney, in Bread Street just three houses south of Cheapside and the…

via Five Cockney…

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