Ireland’s Holocaust heroine | historywithatwist

Mary Elmes during the war years and in later life

Mary Elmes during the war years and in later life

The great events of our past – the wars and the genocides – are just a series of small steps strung together… steps that when looked back upon appear to be a seamless, momentous journey.

And because of that, we tend to overlook many of those very people who created the events that make history so extraordinary.

The name Mary Elmes is not one that conjures up any special memory to most people, and that’s probably just the way the Corkwoman would…

via Ireland’s Holocaust heroine | historywithatwist

Primo Levi: Chemistry and the Holocaust

A R T L▼R K

41vTGy5xYuLOn the 31st of July 1919, the Italian Jewish chemist and writer Primo Levi was born in Turin, Italy. A survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, he emerged after the war as one of the most incisive and candid intellects among those writers who had experienced the Holocaust. He grew up during the years preceding World War II in the relative comfort of a middle class at a time in Italy when being of Jewish ancestry had not yet become a cause of segregation and persecution. In 1937, he enrolled at the University of Turin to study chemistry, which was only one year before the promulgation of the Fascist racial laws. Along with other restrictions, the latter prohibited Jews in Italy from attending public schools. However, due to the fact that he had already begun his studies, he was allowed to remain at university until the completion of his course…

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The Heroic World War Two Volunteer – Charles Joseph Coward

Auschwitz III (Monowitz); Photo Credit

He fought against the Nazis and was sent to a concentration camp. There he spied on his captors and risked his life to save those he could. All that under…

Source: The Heroic World War Two Volunteer – Charles Joseph Coward

May 19, 1944 The Seven Dwarves of Auschwitz – Today in History

Shimson Eizik Ovitz was a Romanian rabbi, a WWI era entertainer, and someone afflicted with pseudoachondroplasia. He was a dwarf. Ovitz fathered 10 children by two normal sized wives, Brana Fruchter and Batia Bertha Husz. Three of them grew to normal height, the other seven…

Source: May 19, 1944, The Seven Dwarves of Auschwitz – Today in History

Auschwitz: Photographs from Hell | Iconic Photos

This week, the world paused briefly to remember 27th January 1945 when the Red Army liberated Auschwitz.  The press release from the White House, now improbably occupied by a man who has sur…

Source: Auschwitz: Photographs from Hell | Iconic Photos

Stanisława Leszczyńska: Auschwitz’s Jewish Midwife That Delivered 3000 Babies.

When Stanisława Leszczyńska completed her midwifery degree never could she have imagined the impact it would have or the legacy it would leave. She was a Jewish prisoner in Auschwitz and she…

Source: Stanisława Leszczyńska: Auschwitz’s Jewish Midwife That Delivered 3000 Babies.

Interview with a Holocaust Survivor | historywithatwist

Frank Grunwald was just 12 years old when he and his family entered the concentration camps. Terezinstadt, Auschwitz, Melk, Mauthausen . . . he was in them all. Unfortunately, neither his brother n…

Source: Interview with a Holocaust Survivor | historywithatwist

Auschwitz mug reveals secret possessions hidden for 70 years

Auschwitz museum staff have uncovered jewellery hidden for 70 years inside a mug with a double bottom.

The “very well hidden” possessions, a gold ring and a necklace, were found by curators carrying out maintenance work on items in the museum.

It was found in one of thousands of enamelled…

Source: Auschwitz mug reveals secret possessions hidden for 70 years

Auschwitz, memory and truth: how trauma passes down the generations | Life and style | The Guardian

Originally posted in The Guardian.

Alison Pick's grandmother Liske and great-grandmother Marianne

I was a Christian child. I went to Sunday school. In the cool church basement, I drew pictures of Jesus and his disciples. Then one day, in the playground, another child approached me. “Your dad is Jewish,” he said. “No he’s not,” I replied instinctively. But deep down, in some profoundly buried part of myself, I knew this was true.

I knew it was true while at the same time not understanding what it meant. Jewish was something that belonged to my friend Jordan – the one who had accused me – but what did it mean to be Jewish? Jordan brought matzah (unleavened bread) to school on Passover, and went to Hebrew school. He was studying for something called a barmitzvah. That was all I knew.

The year passed. Despite the fact I was almost 13, the Easter bunny still came. My younger sister and I hunted for eggs in the rooms of our suburban home.

Easter, I knew, meant rebirth. It meant dying and coming back to life. I felt, deep down, that rebirth could happen to me too.

I came to know the truth about my family’s history slowly. I first learned the facts – my great-grandparents died in Auschwitz; my grandparents came to Canada and hid their true identities. They had been assimilated, non-practising Jews and Canada in the 1940s was hugely antisemitic. They wanted no part of it.

Later, as a teenager, I understood this more profoundly – what it meant to hide who you are. The effort that had gone into their charade, and the…

via Auschwitz, memory and truth: how trauma passes down the generations | Life and style | The Guardian.

Locarno: Drama On Auschwitz Founder Rudolf Hoess Being Touted As First Time An Israeli Director Will Give Voice To The Perpetrator (EXCLUSIVE) | Rogues & Vagabonds

Originally reblogged on Rogues & Vagabonds.

the-interrogation

LOCARNO – Israel and Germany are co-producing “The Interrogation,” a drama based on the autobiography of Auschwitz founder and commander Rudolf Hoess, held responsible for 1.1 million deaths. Israeli company Daroma Productions says the film marks “the first time a Jewish director deals with the Holocaust and gives a voice to the perpetrator.”

The director is Israeli filmmaker and film scholar Erez Pery, making his feature film debut. Pery also wrote the screenplay, based on Hoess’s book “Commandant of Auschwitz.” He is artistic director of the Cinema South International Film Festival in Israel and  author of a Ph.D dissertation titled “The Cinematic Logic of the Nazi Death Camp and Its Influence on Modern Post War Cinema.”

Daroma Productions, which is among companies in attendance at the Locarno Film Festival’s First Look on Israeli Cinema spotlight, is co-producing this potentially powerful movie with Mathias Schwerbrock’s Film Base Berlin.

Film Base co-produced…

via Locarno: Drama On Auschwitz Founder Rudolf Hoess Being Touted As First Time An Israeli Director Will Give Voice To The Perpetrator (EXCLUSIVE) | Rogues & Vagabonds.

The concentration camp commandants: Review of Soldiers of Evil by Thomas Segev

Literaturesalon's Blog

concentrationcampcommandantsjapantimes.co.jp

Thomas Segev’s dissertation, Soldiers of Evil (Jerusalem: Domino Press, 1987), goes a long way in explaining the psychology and social background of the Holocaust’s most ruthless mass murderers: the concentration camp Commandants. The book relies upon eyewitness accounts, victim testimonials, court documents as well as interviews with some of the Commandants themselves, their acquaintances, colleagues and family members who were willing to talk about the past. Segev notes that during Oswald Pohl’s trial (he was the SS Commander in charge of administering the entire Nazi concentration camp system) it was estimated that the Nazis imprisoned about 10 million people. (Soldiers of Evil, 15) By the end of the war, in January 1945, only 700,000 were found alive by the Allies. Of those, tens of thousands died shortly after liberation. Close to one million non-Jewish prisoners and 6 million Jewish prisoners were killed in the Nazi extermination camps.

One…

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Auschwitz survivor welcomes sentencing of Oskar Gröning – video | World news | The Guardian

Leon Schwarzbaum welcomes the four-year sentence passed down at a court in Lüneburg, Germany, on Wednesday to Oskar Gröning, the former Auschwitz bookkeeper found guilty of being an accessory to the murder of 300,000 people. Gröning did not kill anyone himself, but prosecutors argued that by sorting banknotes taken from Jews arriving at Auschwitz, he helped support the regime responsible for mass murder

via Auschwitz survivor welcomes sentencing of Oskar Gröning – video | World news | The Guardian.