East Asian skeletons found in a Londinium cemetery | The Heritage Trust

An artist’s impression of Londinium, centre of the Roman Empire in Britain, circa 200ce

An artist’s impression of Londinium, centre of the Roman Empire in Britain, circa 200ce   Across the river to the south of Londinium was a small suburb that would later become Southwark. It…

Source: East Asian skeletons found in a Londinium cemetery | The Heritage Trust

On this day: the bombing of the Kashmir Princess | In Times Gone By…

The Kashmir Princess, an aircraft operated by Air India, was bombed and sank into the South China Sea on the 11th of April, 1955. Of the nineteen people on board, sixteen died. Zhou Enlai in 1946 I…

Source: On this day: the bombing of the Kashmir Princess | In Times Gone By…

Blonde cargoes: Finnish children in the slave markets of medieval Crimea

You think you know your history and then you come across this article from Blast from the Past about a slave trade involving the Crimea.

A Blast From The Past

Testing a female captive's teeth in an eastern slave market. Testing a female captive’s teeth in an eastern slave market.

The horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade have left an ineradicable mark on history. In the course of a little more than three and a half centuries, 12.5 million prisoners – at least two-thirds of them men destined for a life of labour in the fields – were shipped from holding pens along the African coast to destinations ranging from Argentina in the south all the way north to Canada. It was the largest forced migration in modern history.

When we think of slavery, we tend to think of this African traffic. Yet it was not the only such trade – nor was it, before 1700, even the largest. A second great market in slaves once sullied the world, this one less well-known, vastly longer-lasting, and centred on the Black Sea ports of the Crimea. It was a huge trade in its own right; in its great years, which lasted roughly from…

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Host City Glasgow: signs of slavery and the imperial past are never far away

Originally posted on Host City Glasgow

The “second city of empire” was how this year’s host of the Commonwealth Games used to be well-known. Glasgow’s imperial past is hinted at by names littered throughout the city centre, in geographic pointers such as Virginia Street and Jamaica Street; and tributes to tobacco barons in the likes of Buchanan Street and Ingram Street.

A quarter of the world’s locomotives and a fifth of its ships were built on the banks of the river Clyde in the second half of the 19th century. These were used primarily to transport goods and people around the empire. The route from Glasgow to America was much shorter than the passage from London. As a result, goods such as tobacco, cotton and sugar were all transported and stored by the Clyde. More tobacco was transported through Glasgow than the rest of the United Kingdom combined. This added to the wealth of so-called “tobacco lords”. Beyond street names, the city is still littered…

Read more Host City Glasgow: signs of slavery and the imperial past are never far away.