When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

The Dreadnought hoaxers in their Abyssinian regalia, with Virginia Woolf on the far left. PUBLIC DOMAIN

EVEN A PERSON RUSHING FOR a tight connection at Paddington Station, London, might have stopped to stare at a strange group making its way onto the train to Weymouth on February 7, 1910. Four people, men of foreign extraction, by all appearances, with luxuriant beards, patterned…

Source: When Virginia Woolf Dressed Up as an ‘African’ Prince to Fool the Royal Navy – Atlas Obscura

The 1910 Great Flood of Paris. | If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

In the last week of January 1910, the Seine River flooded the city of Paris and its surrounding neighborhoods causing an estimated 400 million francs worth of damage. Fortunately, no deaths were recorded, but Parisians suffered the indignity of being stranded in the homes and or in the streets of Paris. Emergency services and the military were forced to make headway through the saturated streets in boats to rescue people from second-storey windows and to distribute relief aid. At the conclusion of the emergency crisis that gripped the city, many Parisians were left to wonder what happened?

In the weeks leading to the flood, heavy winter rainfall across northern France filled the Seine’s tributaries. When the deluge of water reached Paris on the 21st January, authorities became increasingly alarmed at the slowly rising Seine. Winter floods were a common occurrence in Paris, but when the Seine River began to rise a lot swifter than usual, panic gripped the city. Over the course of the following week, the Seine rose to an elevated height of 8.62 metres. In the city itself, the water threatened to…

Source: The 1910 Great Flood of Paris. | If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Canada’s Worst Avalanche Disaster

Bite Size Canada

The 1910 Rogers Pass Avalanche killed 58 men clearing a railroad line near the summit of Rogers Pass across the Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia on March 4, 1910. It is Canada’s worst avalanche disaster.

Photo of workers recovering bodies from the avalanche Workers recover bodies and clear the tracks on March 5, 1910.

The winter of 1909–1910 provided conditions particularly conducive to avalanches; many slides experienced during January and February. On March 1, 96 people were killed further south into the Wellington avalanche in Washington State.

Three days later, on the evening of March 4, work crews were dispatched to clear a big slide which had fallen from Cheops Mountain, and buried the tracks just south of Shed 17. The crew consisted of a locomotive-driven rotary snowplow and 59 men. Time was critical as westbound CPR Train Number 97 was just entering the Rocky Mountains, bound for Vancouver.

Half an hour before midnight as the track was…

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