When Christmas was cancelled: what 1647’s riots and rebellion can teach us today

Back in 1647, Christmas was banned in the kingdoms of England (which at the time included Wales), Scotland and Ireland and it didn’t work out very well. Following a total ban on everything festive, from decorations to gatherings, rebellions broke out across the country. While some activity took the form of hanging holly in defiance, other action was …

Source: When Christmas was cancelled: what 1647’s riots and rebellion can teach us today

Revealing NEW information about Dido Elizabeth Belle’s siblings – All Things Georgian

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray, c.1778. Formerly attributed to Johann Zoffany.

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray, c.1778. Formerly attributed to Johann Zoffany.

We’re very excited to be able to bring you some new information about Dido Elizabeth Belle.

Dido was the natural daughter of a former African slave woman and Sir John Lindsay; she was brought up alongside her cousin, Lady Elizabeth Murray at their great-uncle William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield’s estate, Kenwood House in Hampstead, London. You may have seen…

via Revealing NEW information about Dido Elizabeth Belle’s siblings – All Things Georgian

January 29, 1944 Operation Pied Piper – Today in History

94330In the summer of 1938, the horrors of the Great War were a mere twenty years in the past.  Hitler had swallowed up Austria, only six months earlier.   Authorities divided the British Isles into “risk zones”, identified as “evacuation,” “neutral,” and “reception.”  In some of the most gut wrenching decisions of the age, these people were planning “Operation Pied Piper”, the evacuation of…

via January 29, 1944 Operation Pied Piper – Today in History

Haddon Musings’ Feminist Friday – Marie Stopes | Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes was born on 15th October 1880 in Edinburgh.  Her father Henry was a brewer, engineer, architect and palaeontologist, and her mother Charlotte was a Shakespearean scholar and women’s rights campaigner.  Her parents had met at one of the meetings of The British Association for the Advancement of Science.  Marie was taken to the meetings, where she met…

Source: Haddon Musings’ Feminist Friday – Marie Stopes | Stevie Turner, Indie Author.

Eric Liddell, the Record Breaking Olympian Who Kept Hope Alive in a Japanese Prison Camp

The Scotsman Eric Liddell is best remembered for his sporting accomplishments from the 1981 film that dramatized them, Chariots of Fire. However, his recor…

Source: Eric Liddell, the Record Breaking Olympian Who Kept Hope Alive in a Japanese Prison Camp

Britain is a country and Scotland a nation which say “Farewell” to an old, wartime airman called Jock Moffat

Seventy-five years ago Jock, who has died peacefully in Perthshire at the age of aged 97, played, what would turn out to be, a crucial role in the torpedoing and sinking of the Bismarck, Germany’s largest and most powerful battleship in the Second World War, thus ending the threat to…

Source: Britain is no country for old men: Britain is a country and Scotland a nation which say “Farewell” to an old, wartime airman called Jock Moffat, who 75 years ago, as David, attacked a battleship called The Bismarck, his Goliath

William Ash: The Prisoner of War Who Wouldn’t Stop Escaping

untitled-design-5-14-640x334

William Ash was a survivor of the Nazis’ prisoner of war camps, surviving starvation, freezing temperatures, violence and slave labor.

For the prisoners who survived you’d think they would come back to capitalist society with open arms, but William Ash came back with a thorough swing to the left.

William was a Spitfire pilot with…

Source: William Ash: The Prisoner of War Who Wouldn’t Stop Escaping

Incredible 5,000-Year-Old Temple Complex In Orkney Could Re-Write History Of Scotland | MessageToEagle.com

More important than Stonehenge: The temple precinct being uncovered in Orkney contains 100 Stone Age buildings

MessageToEagle.com – The excavations at the Ness of Brodgar have been attracting a lot of attention recently and now it’s time for yet another surprise that could re-write the history of Scotland and change our image of prehistoric people who inhabited this region. Ness of Brodgar is an archaeological site between the Ring of Brodgar and […]

Source: Incredible 5,000-Year-Old Temple Complex In Orkney Could Re-Write History Of Scotland | MessageToEagle.com

Maria Clementina Sobieska | Culloden Battlefield

maria

Maria Clementina Sobieska

We have all heard, and know at least a little, of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, (‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’) but today we take a look at his mother Maria Clementina Sobieska. Born in 1702,…

Source: Maria Clementina Sobieska | Culloden Battlefield

Scurvy, Vaccination and Hospitals

Citrus fruits perfect for treating Scurvy

As this week saw the celebration of International Nurses day, on 12th May, this weeks blog takes a look at some medical history. During the 18th Century there were many innovations in medicine and …

Source:  Scurvy, Vaccination and Hospitals

Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

Flyting from Norse folklore and Old England should be incorporated into American politics. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

Imagine a world that had swapped its guns for puns and its IEDs for repartees. Such a planet is possible if only those in power would manage their conflicts with flyting, the time-honored sport of verbal jousting.

Flyting is a stylized battle of insults and wits that was practiced most actively between the fifth and 16th centuries in England and Scotland. Participants employed the timeless tools of provocation and perversion as well as satire, rhetoric, and early bathroom humor to publicly trounce opponents. The term “flyting” comes from Old English and Old Norse words for “quarrel” and “provocation.” ‘Tis a form of highly poetic abuse, or highly abusive poetry—a very early precursor to MTV’s Yo Mama and Eminem’s 8 Mile.

“Court flyting” sometimes served as entertainment for royals such as Scottish kings James IV and James V. The most famous surviving exchange is The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, which was performed in the early 16th century by…

Source: Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

Seven-meter Torpedo Found At Scapa Flow Linked To Sinking Of HMS Royal Oak

A seven-meter torpedo was discovered last month in Scapa Flow, a shallow-bottomed bay sheltered by Scotland’s northern islands. Experts believe that the torpedo was fired by a German U-boat at the HMS Royal Oak at the beginning of World War II.

It was found during a routine sonar survey by Sula Diving for Orkney Islands Council.Royal Navy divers from a nearby base arrived to see…

Source: Seven-meter Torpedo Found At Scapa Flow Linked To Sinking Of HMS Royal Oak

The Ninth Legion, Hadrian’s Wall and the Division of Britain | toritto

It is the year 120 A.D., the Romans are in southern Britain and Hadrian is Emperor in far away Rome.  The Romans first came to Britain with Julius Caesar, came back again during the reign of Claudius and now one hundred years later are fully encamped.

In 43AD the Ninth Legion is thought to have landed at Richborough with the rest of the Roman invasion force comprising the Second, Twentieth and Fourteenth Legions. The invasion force was under the command of Aulus Plautius who was the governor of Pannonia (western Hungary and eastern Austria) just prior to the Claudian invasion.

Seventeen years later the Ninth was mauled during the Boudicean uprising and was eventually posted to the most exposed northern outpost of Roman Britain, spending much…

Source: The Ninth Legion, Hadrian’s Wall and the Division of Britain | toritto