Pilot Fish Trailblazer Nominee: The Iron Man of India – Pilot Fish

The Great Divide

Studio/31.10.49,A22b Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel photograph on October 31, 1949, his 74th birthday.

Studio/31.10.49,A22b
Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel photograph on October 31, 1949, his 74th birthday.

The nation of India was born, on the 15th August, 1947. Pakistan was born on the 14th August, 1947.The border between the two countries was not revealed until a few days later. What followed then was a period of howling madness. Hindus from the new Pakistan lost their assets and came to India as refugees. My family was amongst them. Muslims from India suffered likewise.

What followed was an orgy of violence. New-found hatred gave way to bloodshed. People who had been neighbours for generations, hacked away at each other. An estimated half million to one million people died in the waves of violence that followed Independence. Others have estimated that…

Source: Pilot Fish Trailblazer Nominee: The Iron Man of India – Pilot Fish

Jinnah: Hero or Villain?

Muhammad Ali Jinnah and the Pakistani flag.

Quite possibly, Muhammad Ali Jinnah may be one of the most historically ambiguous figures of the twentieth century. He is maligned by his opposition almost more than he is adored by his followers. In fact, in a day and age when Pakistan struggles with accusations of being ‘the terror factory of the world’ many Pakistanis themselves begin to doubt their founder. And yet, they continue to call him ‘Quaid-E-Azam’ which in literal translation means ‘The Great Leader’. The Partition was a division of India into two independent countries and resulted in a mass movement of people on a scale the world had never seen before. Indian Muslims rushed to go to a country which seemed to be the promise of a new future and Pakistani Hindus and Sikhs headed in the opposite way for India. Needless to say, it caused unprecedented violence and misery.

The question is, despite being blamed as the sole cause of the Partition massacres by many Indian historians, why does a man like Jinnah still hold a unique place in the heart of…

Source: Jinnah: Hero or Villain?

Ace History News | SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: Fanny Bullock Workman one of the first female Professional Mountaineer’s

Originally posted on Ace History News.

Fanny Bullock Workman (1859–1925) was an American geographer, cartographer, explorer, travel writer, and mountaineer, notably in the Himalayas. She was one of the first female professional mountaineers; she not only explored but also wrote about her adventures.

She set several women’s altitude records, published eight travel books with her husband, and championed women’s rights and women’s suffrage. Educated in the finest schools available to women, she was introduced to climbing in New Hampshire. She married William Hunter Workman, and traveled the world with him. The couple had two children, but left them in schools and with nurses. Workman saw herself as…

via Ace History News | SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: Fanny Bullock Workman one of the first female Professional Mountaineer’s .

Partition 1947 – The Voices Across The Bitter Borders

The Human Lens

0,,16501803_303,00One of the greatest tragedies of the Indo-Pakistan relationship has significant roots into the people’s polarization during British controlled India. There is not enough ink to bleed for writing on the damage partition has done to our people. While the British held on to subcontinent called otherwise in history as “Jewel in the Crown” they only let it go until there was no choice left.

As a south asian and Muhajir Pakistani who has her origins on other side of the border-India; despite taking deep pride in my country and its independence my emotions don’t over shed the negatives of subcontinent separation and how it happened. The violent way we were divided continues to overshadow both our nations’ future and that of its people. Permit me to say that millions still grieve, we could separate but minus the violence. Inside this great land; the Hindus, Sikhs, Muslims, Jains, Christians etc…

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