Forensic Film Archiving: Who Raised the Flag on Iwo Jima? | The Unwritten Record

Joe Rosenthal’s photograph of the flag-raising on Iwo Jima. (NAID: 520748)

We rely on film and photographs to tell stories every day – from the latest blockbuster, our favorite television series, videos we take and stream, to the cherished photos in our homes. But, sometimes what we see isn’t what’s really there. Such was the case of the misidentified Marine in one…

Source: Forensic Film Archiving: Who Raised the Flag on Iwo Jima? | The Unwritten Record

The History Girls: Of hair and hairdressers in historic Japan by Debra Daley

The ways in which women of low social class earned a living in the 18th century, outside of prostitution and domestic service, always arouses my curiosity. During a recent research session, I came upon a print made around 1776 in Japan of a kabuki actor dressed as a kamiyui, a female hairdresser. It interested me to read that a woman who worked as a kamiyui was likely to make enough money to…

Source: The History Girls: Of hair and hairdressers in historic Japan by Debra Daley

East Asian skeletons found in a Londinium cemetery | The Heritage Trust

An artist’s impression of Londinium, centre of the Roman Empire in Britain, circa 200ce

An artist’s impression of Londinium, centre of the Roman Empire in Britain, circa 200ce   Across the river to the south of Londinium was a small suburb that would later become Southwark. It…

Source: East Asian skeletons found in a Londinium cemetery | The Heritage Trust

Japanese WWII Vet Sees Trouble on the Horizon | Pacific Paratrooper

NAGANO, Japan — Kaname Harada was once a feared samurai of the sky, shooting down 19 Allied aircraft as a pilot of Japan’s legendary Zero fighter plane during World War II. Now 98 years old and in …

Source: Japanese WWII Vet Sees Trouble on the Horizon | Pacific Paratrooper

Saburo Sakai, WWII Japanese Ace – know who you’re up against | Pacific Paratrooper

As the Intermission stories come to a close, until we reach the break of 1944-1945, we take a look at one of the pilots the Allied Air Forces were up against…..   Saburō Sakai in the co…

Source: Saburo Sakai, WWII Japanese Ace – know who you’re up against | Pacific Paratrooper

Jimmy Doolittle raiders: From one generation to another | Eagle-Eyed Editor

It’s an interesting thing to analyze how action by someone can be a crucial turning point in history. Sometimes it’s about a person just being in the right place at the right time or the wrong place at the right time, or coming up with an idea that initially seems so improbable that it couldn’t possibly work, but it does.

The airborne raid led by pilot Jimmy Doolittle against Japan after Pearl Harbor was one of those seemingly improbable ideas. I’ve been reading James M. Scott’s Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle And The Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor. The raid had many effects. It restored morale to the United States, destroyed Japan’s belief that they were invulnerable, and led to Japan’s decision to attack Midway, which would eventually create the circumstances for Japan’s defeat.

The movie “Pearl Harbor” touches on Doolittle’s raid near the end, but Scott’s book…

Source: Jimmy Doolittle raiders: From one generation to another | Eagle-Eyed Editor

The Good German of Nanking | toritto

So you’re a middle-aged German business man, working for Siemens A.G. in Nanking, China in 1938.  You’re a member in good standing of the Nazi Party (though you haven’t lived in Germany for almost 30 years) and you begin to see war crimes and atrocities with your own eyes.

What do you do – especially taking into consideration that the war crimes are being perpetrated by the military of a country on friendly terms with your own?

This was the situation of John Rabe, born in Hamburg in 1887 and living in China since 1908.

“Many Westerners were living in the Chinese capital city of the time, as Nanking was until December 1937, conducting trade or on missionary trips. As the Japanese army approached Nanking and initiated bombing raids on the city, all but 22 foreigners fled the city, with 15 American and European missionaries and businessmen forming part of the remaining group.  On November 22, 1937, as the Japanese Army advanced on Nanking, Rabe, along with other foreign nationals, organized the International Committee for the Nanking Safety Zone and created the…

Source: The Good German of Nanking | toritto

vintage everyday: The Real Samurais – 24 Interesting Vintage Portraits of Japanese Warriors in the middle-late 1800s

The Real Samurais – 24 Interesting Vintage Portraits of Japanese Warriors in the middle-late 1800s

Source: vintage everyday: The Real Samurais – 24 Interesting Vintage Portraits of Japanese Warriors in the middle-late 1800s

Liberty Belle’s Last Flight | IHRA

Originally posted on IHRA.

Balikpapan after the 22nd dropped their bombs on the target area.

Balikpapan. A Japanese stronghold in the earlier part of the Pacific war. At the time, it was heavily defended by some of Japan’s best pilots, and the Allies hoped to change that soon. General George C. Kenney in particular felt that if Fifth Air Force was to destroy the oil refineries on the island, it would be a huge setback in Japan’s attempt to hold onto its position in the southwest Pacific. Over the summer, Kenney directed the 380th Bomb Group to bomb several refineries in the area, with little success, though they were a factor in some fuel shortages. By September, he was eager to send his forces back to Balikpapan. There were a few missions flown by the Thirteenth Air Force and the 90th Bomb Group, however, approximately 40% of the planes flown on these mission were either lost or too damaged to be put back in service afterwards.

Due to the heavy losses suffered by the Thirteenth during these raids, plans were changed. Kenney soon gathered together reinforcements for what would be the largest raid yet for the Fifth and Thirteenth Air Forces. Among the 22nd Bomb Group crews participating was one from the 33rd Squadron in the B-24 named Liberty Belle, which was flown by…

Source: Liberty Belle’s Last Flight | IHRA.

John Barrow saw Japanese women at Saipan throw babies off cliff then jump themselves | War Tales

John Henry Barrow II of Royal Palm Retirement Centre in Port Charlotte, Fla. served aboard a destroyer and a sub chaser in the Pacific during World War II. He took part in some of the major battles—Saipan, Iwo Jima and Okinawa to name three. Saipan is the one the 90-year-old former local sailor remembers best.

“At Saipan Adm. Nimitz ordered our sub chasers close to shore. We were to fire at Japanese position and when they fired back at us it was our job to report their locations,” Barrow said. “Then we’d knock out the enemy with the 16-inch guns from our battleships off shore.“We could see the shells from our big guns coming right over us and…

Source: John Barrow saw Japanese women at Saipan throw babies off cliff then jump themselves | War Tales

The Heroism of Chiune Sugihara – Saved Countless Jews From Nazi Deathcamps

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Chiune Sugihara is not a name that immediately springs to mind when thinking of Japanese Second World War heroes, but his story is remarkable.

Born in January 1900 in the small Japanese town of Yaotsu, Chiune was an excellent scholar. He graduated from high school with top marks. He gained a place at the famous Waseda University in Tokyo where he studied English. He paid his way through university by taking several part-time jobs.

When he was 19, Sugihara discovered that the Japanese Foreign Ministry was looking for people who wanted to work in the overseas diplomatic service, and he applied. The entrance exam was…

Source: The Heroism of Chiune Sugihara – Saved Countless Jews From Nazi Deathcamps

Japanese Diary on Kolombangara | Pacific Paratrooper

In New Georgia on the Solomon Islands a Japanese private soldier found himself thrown into a campaign that had already been lost. He and his companions from the 23rd Infantry Regiment were landed on Baanga Island, where the troops in occupation were already in retreat. U.S. forces were already well established on nearby islands and the seas around were patrolled by PT boats and destroyers, making it increasingly difficult for the Japanese to land reinforcements or supplies.Little is known about Tadashi Higa apart from what was found in his diary which was found by the Americans and translated for intelligence purposes. On the 3rd August 1943 he made the following entry…

Source: Japanese Diary on Kolombangara | Pacific Paratrooper