The Other Pearl Harbor Story – Kimmel and Short | Pacific Paratrooper

People around the nation, including some vocal congressmen, asked why America had been caught off guard at Pearl Harbor. President Franklin D. Roosevelt said he would appoint an investigatory commi…

Source: The Other Pearl Harbor Story – Kimmel and Short | Pacific Paratrooper

Remembering Pearl Harbor Day – Honoring the Bravery of Army Nurse Annie G. Fox

annie_fox-219x300December 7 is Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day when Americans commemorate the 1941 attack that brought the United States into World War II. The Japanese attack shocked a nation that had heretofore resisted entering foreign wars by bringing the conflict to its shores. Dozens of stories of heroism emerged after the attacks, including that of the inspiring…

Source: Remembering Pearl Harbor Day – Honoring the Bravery of Army Nurse Annie G. Fox

Annie Montague Alexander, Naturalist and Fossil Hunter. | Letters from Gondwana.

Originally posted on Letters from Gondwana.
Annie Montague Alexander was born on December 29, 1867, in Honolulu, Hawaii. She was the oldest daughter of Samuel Thomas Alexander and Martha Cooke. Both of her parents were the children of missionaries from New England who had come to the Hawaiian Archipelago in 1832. Her father pioneered in the raising of sugar cane on Maui, and founder of Alexander & Baldwin, Inc., one of the biggest companies in Hawaii.

Annie was educated at home by a governess until age fourteen, when she attended Punahou School in Honolulu for one year. In 1882, she moved with her family to Oakland, California. In the fall of 1887, she attended the Lasell Seminary for Young Women, a junior college in Auburndale, Massachusetts. At Lasell, she would join a close childhood friend from Maui, Mary Beckwith. During the two years she spent there she not enrolled in any science classes but studied nineteenth-century history, political economy, civil government, German, French, logic, dress cutting, and photography. Shortly after, she started to study painting in Paris. Unfortunately she began to suffer severe headaches after long hours at the easel and was warned of the possibility of blindness. Later, she enrolled in a training program for…

Source: Annie Montague Alexander, Naturalist and Fossil Hunter. | Letters from Gondwana.

Queen Liliʻuokalani, first and last queen regnant of Hawaii – Amazing Women In History

Originally posted on Amazing Women In History.

Liliʻuokalani (1838–1917), born Lydia Lili’u Loloku Walania Wewehi Kamakaeha, was the first female monarch to reign in her own right. Up until the 1890s, the Kingdom of Hawai was an independent sovereign state, officially recognized by the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and Germany. During Liliʻuokalani’s reign, the Overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii took place in 1893, when she abdicated “to avoid any collision of armed forces, and perhaps the loss of life”.

Queen Liliʻuokalani is remembered for her many musical compositions, including the famous song “Aloha &#699Oe” (“Farewell the Thee”). Many of these were written during her imprisonment after she abdicated her throne, and they express a deep love of her land and people.

Lydia Lili’u Loloku Walania Wewehi Kamakaeha was born, one of 15 children, on September 2, 1838 to High Chiefess Analea Keohokālole and High Chief Kaluaiku Kamakaʻehukai Kahana Keola Kapaʻakea. Her mother was one of the fifteen counsellors of the king Kamehameha III.

Following Hawai’ian naming practices, Liliʻuokalani’s given name at birth was Lydia Liliʻu Loloku Walania Wewehi Kamakaʻeha. Traditionally, Hawaiʻian parents created new names for their children, giving careful thought to their meaning. Sometimes these names were revealed in dreams or visions. Incidents before or during a child’s birth were considered significant in their naming, as in Liliʻu’s case. Liliʻu’s great-aunt developed an eye infection at the time of her birth, which is why she was given the names “Liliʻu” meaning “smarting”; “Loloku” meaning tearful; “Walania”, “a burning pain”; and “Kamakaʻeha”, “sore eyes”. Though it may seem strange to us, in Hawaiʻian culture these names were not considered bad, ugly, or unlucky; they commemorated…

via Queen Liliʻuokalani, first and last queen regnant of Hawaii – Amazing Women In History.