The Crusader Conquest of Constantinople | toritto

crusades

It is the Year of Our Lord 1075 and a great disaster has befallen Christendom.

The Islāmic armies of the Seljuk Turks have taken Jerusalem.

In Western Europe, the Roman Empire is gone some 600 years.  In the East the empire still lives at Constantinople, its Emperor ruling portions of the eastern shore of the Adriatic through the Balkans and Greece into Asia Minor and Syria.  It is in constant conflict with the…

via The Crusader Conquest of Constantinople | toritto

August 10, 1920, Ottoman Empire – Today in History

Throughout the period, the “secret sauce” of Ottoman power was an army of élite infantry called “Janissaries”.  Janissaries were Christian slaves, usually taken as spoils of…

Source: August 10, 1920, Ottoman Empire – Today in History

Nelly | Greece | Iconic Photos

How do you memorialize someone like Nelly? On one hand, she was a pioneering woman photographer and her photos of Greek temples and columns set against sea and sky shaped – and it can be argued, st…

Source: Nelly | Greece | Iconic Photos

Fossils cast doubt on human lineage originating in Africa | Reuters

The lower jaw of the 7.175 million-year-old Graecopithecus freybergi (El Graeco) from Pyrgos Vassilissis, Greece is shown in this handout provided May 19, 2017. Courtesy of Wolfgang Gerber, University of Tübingen/Handout via REUTERS

Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa.

Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an…

Source: Fossils cast doubt on human lineage originating in Africa | Reuters

John Pendlebury and the Battle of Crete – Paddy’s speech | Patrick Leigh Fermor

John Pendlebury at Knossos

The following is the text of a speech given by Patrick Leigh Fermor at Knossos, Crete, on 21 May as part of the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Crete. by Patrick Leigh Fermor…

Source: John Pendlebury and the Battle of Crete – Paddy’s speech | Patrick Leigh Fermor

The Battle of Crete Was The Reason Hitler Abandoned Parachute Assaults For Good

The Battle of Crete changed the way that Hitler thought about paratroopers forever, and gave the Germans a vital base in the Mediterranean.

Source: The Battle of Crete Was The Reason Hitler Abandoned Parachute Assaults For Good

State of Emergency – Citizens Evacuated as 500lb WW2 Bomb discovered in Greece

70,000 people in the Greek city of Thessaloniki were evacuated to allow experts to defuse a WWII-era bomb. The bomb was discovered by…

Source: State of Emergency – Citizens Evacuated as 500lb WW2 Bomb discovered in Greece

Recovering Palimpsests | crafty theatre

I’m thrilled! The future is here! The speculation of yesterday is the modus operandi of today! Early on in my blogging life, I pondered the loss of Menander’s comedies. How could the wor…

Source: Recovering Palimpsests | crafty theatre

Christmas 1914: Chandos Hoskyns in the Trenches

FROM THE ARCHIVE [yearly re-post]

My maternal grandfather, Chandos Hoskyns was commissioned into The Rifle Brigade [Greenjackets] in 1914. During The Great War, he fought in Thessaloniki, Greece, and in the trenches of France from where he sent the following letter in which he tells his family about something surprising and unusual.

2nd Bn Rifle Bde.
25th Inf Bde.
8th Divn.
Brit. Exp. Force

[Xmas 1914]

Darling all!

I hope you got my Xmas letter all right only I hear Grannie sent it on, the one thing I did not want done as I particularly wanted you all to get it together on Xmas day.

I am sending you the IVth Corps Xmas Card – rather a crude drawing I’m afraid but you’ll find it rather interesting as it has on it all the signatures of the other company officers. It will be rather nice to keep won’t it. E P Watts 53rd Sikhs (FF) is attached to us as second in command of the company. He is a topper. He is in the Indian Army (FF = Frontier Force) & as hard as nails.

I got a topping letter from Mr Gilbert at the same time as your last one. Just after I got it a frantic [?] note came from HQRS “Stand to arms at once!! this was in the trenches. Apparently an aeroplane of ours had been reconnoitring & had seen masses of G’s troops concentrating behind the village in front of us. Great excitement. That night patrols went out to find out what they could. One came back saying the Germans were cutting their own barbed wire entanglements to get through preparatory to making an attack. However nothing happened. On our right some miles away the line was heavily attacked. Later on a funny thing happened. A patrol went, (trembling in every limb) got quite close to the enemy and actually heard — (another thrilling instalment in our next issue) a man playing a penny whistle & man singing!

Well there is no more news to tell. We are resting now after 6 days running in trenches. By Jove the dirt – One almost walks about without meaning to.

Much love to all

Your loving

Chan

I am indebted to Tony Allen of World War I Postcards for the use of both images.

Chandos Hoskyns was the son of Benedict and Dora Hoskyns of the Sicilian Earthquake feature.

Related

Sarah Vernon © 20 June 2014

Greece, The Unsung Hero Of WWII

The argument here is that the role of the Greeks in WW2 is being unjustly overlooked and forgotten about. The Greek mainland was occupied by the axis armies on April 30th 1941 after the “Battle of …

Source: Greece, The Unsung Hero Of WWII

The Minoans | Letters from Athens

On the island of Crete, which lies nearer to the coast of Africa than to the Greek mainland, a brilliant civilization flourished from approximately 3650 to 1400 BCE. It was rediscovered at the begi…

Source: The Minoans | Letters from Athens

Organically Greek: A brave new world – Nea Hora (Νέα Χώρα Χανίων)

On a recent walk through the old town of Hania, I came across a part of the Venetian wall encircling the town which is connected with refugee history. The long black markings on this part of the wall, on the western side near the outskirts the old town, approaching the suburb of Nea Hora, were made by the iron hooks that were nailed into the wall for the makeshift accommodation that housed the refugees from the 1922 population exchange. This is where the refugees set up temporary homes, camping out in this area until they were allotted land where they could…

Source: Organically Greek: A brave new world – Nea Hora (Νέα Χώρα Χανίων)

March 25th: celebrating the Annunciation and the War of Independence | Letters from Athens

One of our main national celebrations in Greece is March 25, which commemorates the start of the 1821 Greek Revolution against the Ottoman Empire, a revolt whose motto was the cry “Freedom or death.”

Following the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Greece remained under Turkish occupation for four centuries. After a number of unsuccessful attempts at revolt, the War of Independence started in 1821. Despite many reversals, this would lead to the establishment of a Greek sovereign state with the London Protocol of 1830, signed by England, France and Russia – the allies who intervened to help win the war. The Greek struggle had elicited strong sympathy in Europe, and many leading intellectuals had promoted the Greek cause, including…

Source: March 25th: celebrating the Annunciation and the War of Independence | Letters from Athens

Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Who would have thought that a tiny small square piece of stone, glass or pottery called tesserae would have such an important impact on culture and art history? As far back as the fourth millennium, on the walls of the Uruk in Mesopotamia, pieces of coloured stone cones were inlaid in a pattern, that bear a resemblance to mosaics. In the period of ancient history, more familiar to us though, the Greeks and pre-Christian Romans, enriched the floors of Hellenistic villas and Roman dwellings with magnificent mosaics. Mosaics were made almost always strictly for the rich, in painstaking detail, by the best artists of the day. Some of the most popular subjects for mosaics in ancient Greece and Rome were…

Source: Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Christmas 1914: Chandos Hoskyns in the Trenches

FROM THE ARCHIVE

My maternal grandfather, Chandos Hoskyns was commissioned into The Rifle Brigade [Greenjackets] in 1914. During The Great War, he fought in Thessaloniki, Greece, and in the trenches of France from where he sent the following letter in which he tells his family about something surprising and unusual.

2nd Bn Rifle Bde.
25th Inf Bde.
8th Divn.
Brit. Exp. Force

[Xmas 1914]

Darling all!

I hope you got my Xmas letter all right only I hear Grannie sent it on, the one thing I did not want done as I particularly wanted you all to get it together on Xmas day.

I am sending you the IVth Corps Xmas Card – rather a crude drawing I’m afraid but you’ll find it rather interesting as it has on it all the signatures of the other company officers. It will be rather nice to keep won’t it. E P Watts 53rd Sikhs (FF) is attached to us as second in command of the company. He is a topper. He is in the Indian Army (FF = Frontier Force) & as hard as nails.

I got a topping letter from Mr Gilbert at the same time as your last one. Just after I got it a frantic [?] note came from HQRS “Stand to arms at once!! this was in the trenches. Apparently an aeroplane of ours had been reconnoitring & had seen masses of G’s troops concentrating behind the village in front of us. Great excitement. That night patrols went out to find out what they could. One came back saying the Germans were cutting their own barbed wire entanglements to get through preparatory to making an attack. However nothing happened. On our right some miles away the line was heavily attacked. Later on a funny thing happened. A patrol went, (trembling in every limb) got quite close to the enemy and actually heard — (another thrilling instalment in our next issue) a man playing a penny whistle & man singing!

Well there is no more news to tell. We are resting now after 6 days running in trenches. By Jove the dirt – One almost walks about without meaning to.

Much love to all

Your loving

Chan

I am indebted to Tony Allen of World War I Postcards for the use of both images.

Chandos Hoskyns was the son of Benedict and Dora Hoskyns of the Sicilian Earthquake feature.

Related

Sarah Vernon © 20 June 2014