“The Ideal German Soldier” | toritto

“The Ideal German Soldier” –  appearing on the front page of Berliner Tagsblatt newspaper, Sunday edition during the invasion of Poland – 1939. Our soldier’s picture w…

Source: “The Ideal German Soldier” | toritto

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Tilly Edinger vs. the Nazis. | Letters from Gondwana.

“Tilly” Edinger was born on November 13, 1897, in Frankfurt, Germany. She was the youngest daughter of the eminent neurologist Ludwig Edinger and Dora Goldschmidt, a leading social advocate and acti…

Source: Tilly Edinger vs. the Nazis. | Letters from Gondwana.

The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog

A guest post by LH Member Suzie Grogan. This article first appeared in London Historians Members’ Newsletter from November 2013. Before 1914, the idea that war could be waged in the air was b…

Source: The ‘First’ Blitz | London Historians’ Blog

Gerda Taro, A forgotten photojournalist – artinmanyforms

In July 1937 a Jewish émigré from Nazi Germany became the first female war photographer to die on assignment. At the age of 26, Gerda Taro was just starting to make a name for herself and had alrea…

Source: Gerda Taro,A forgotten photojournalist – artinmanyforms

Intermission Story (8) – Jimmy Stewart | Pacific Paratrooper

Jimmy Stewart suffered such extreme PTSD after being a bomber pilot in World War II that he acted out his mental distress during ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’.  Stewart played George Bailey in the classi…

Source: Intermission Story (8) – Jimmy Stewart | Pacific Paratrooper

A Very Dangerous Woman: Baroness Moura Budberg – Wonders & Marvels

Spy, seductress, aristocrat, Baroness Moura Budberg was a mystery to everyone who knew her, even her closest friends and her children.

In London in the 1950s, she was a renownedMoura in Moscow 1918 saloniste; nobody else had the magnetic charm or the air of danger and mystery that surrounded Baroness Budberg, and her soirées attracted Graham Greene, Laurence Olivier, Guy Burgess, Bertrand Russell, David Lean, E. M. Forster, Peter Ustinov – all came to drink …

Source: A Very Dangerous Woman: Baroness Moura Budberg – Wonders & Marvels

I have just finished reading the book co-authored by Deborah McDonald and Jeremy Dronfield and it’s excellent.  Sarah Vernon

She survived Hitler and wants to warn America – On the Front Lines of the Culture Wars

I prepared this re-blog in August last year and then completely forgot about it. Since then, of course, Donald Trump has become the President.

Austrian kids loyal to Hitler

Kitty Werthmann survived Hitler. “What I am about to tell you is something you’ve probably never heard or read in history books,” she likes to tell audiences. “I am a witness to history.  “I cannot tell you that Hitler took […]

Source: She survived Hitler and wants to warn America – On the Front Lines of the Culture Wars

The History Girls: Her own worst Enemy: Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821) by Charlotte Betts

Whilst Caroline isn’t the main character in The Dressmaker’s Secret, the factual events of her life frame the plot for my heroine, Emilia. She becomes a member of Caroline’s household in Italy, before travelling to England to find her lost family and unravel the mystery of priceless stolen paintings.

In 1794 Princess Caroline of Brunswick was twenty-six years old and…

Source: The History Girls: Her own worst Enemy: Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821) by Charlotte Betts

John Pendlebury and the Battle of Crete – Paddy’s speech | Patrick Leigh Fermor

John Pendlebury at Knossos

The following is the text of a speech given by Patrick Leigh Fermor at Knossos, Crete, on 21 May as part of the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Crete. by Patrick Leigh Fermor…

Source: John Pendlebury and the Battle of Crete – Paddy’s speech | Patrick Leigh Fermor

V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

Re-blog from 8 May 2015

Benedicta Leigh 1922—2000 [photo: David Sim]

My mother, Benedicta Leigh, was in her late teens when the Second World War broke out. She signed up to be a VAD [Voluntary Aid Detachment] nurse and was working at a hospital in London when German…

Source: V.E. Day — Benedicta Leigh | First Night History

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

April 22, 1918 – The Red Baron – Today in History

By way of comparison, the highest scoring Allied ace of the Great War was Frenchman René Fonck, with 75 confirmed victories. The highest scoring fighter pilot from the British Empire was Canadian B…

Source: April 22, 1918 – The Red Baron – Today in History

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

The Battle of Crete Was The Reason Hitler Abandoned Parachute Assaults For Good

The Battle of Crete changed the way that Hitler thought about paratroopers forever, and gave the Germans a vital base in the Mediterranean.

Source: The Battle of Crete Was The Reason Hitler Abandoned Parachute Assaults For Good

The Welsh copper who became a Nazi double agent | historywithatwist

We have fanciful notions about spies – the men are dashing James Bond-types and the women are exotic, like Mata Hari. Alas, the reality can often be more prosaic. Take, for example, Gwilym Wi…

Source: The Welsh copper who became a Nazi double agent | historywithatwist

WWII Bunker Under Gare de l’Est – Paris, France – Atlas Obscura

Bright sunlight streams in through the glass sunroof as thousands of travelers make their way across the central halls at the Gare de l’Est. The Parisian landmark is a key terminal in the French railway system. But underneath the daily humdrum activity there exists a carefully maintained bunker, whose history is shrouded in secrecy.

Source: WWII Bunker Under Gare de l’Est – Paris, France – Atlas Obscura

March 24, 1944 Tom, Dick and Harry – Today in History

For those of us of a certain age, this story is very familiar even if only from the film, The Wooden Horse (1950).  Today in History‘s article may provide details you didn’t previously know.

Barracks were built on pilings to discourage tunnelling, creating 24” of open space beneath the buildings. Seismic listening devices were placed around the camp’s perimeter. In the German mind, the …

Source: March 24, 1944 Tom, Dick and Harry – Today in History